Ryan Kelly- OC Alabama

6-4 1/4, 311, (O) 5.03

7.58 3-C, 4.59 SS,

33.5" Arms, 26 Reps,

 9'1"! Broad

Simply The Best.

By TOM

I was of the belief that no one should take an OC in the 1st Round in this Draft. There are too many terrific centers in this Draft. But when I watched Kelly's Tape, and was able to just focus on him, he was a force right in the middle of the Alabama O-line. He was a RS Senior. "The fifth year was huge for me," Kelly said. "This year, I finally learned how to play overall with power, more consistent, and that's what I needed to do for the offense." He was named Offensive player of the week six times by his coaches this year.

He was the brains of the O-line, and the offense as well. "He has to make sure everybody has the right calls" Henry said. "[That] everybody's doing the right thing. He does a great job at his job, but he has to make sure other guys are doing their jobs, so that's why I call him the heart of the offense." He played in two different systems. When coach Kiffin came to Alabama, he was expected run outside more on screens, and pulled outside on sweeps and tosses sometimes as well. He was surprisingly great in those roles for such a big OC. 

Great burst to second level. He not only handles guy in front of him, but he has the quickness to get up field and take out linebackers. Showed that he can pull outside and hit a moving target. So he has some potential at OG. He had a great Senior season: 

SENIOR (2015): A three-year starter at center and the Crimson Tide’s signal-calling anchor ... named the Rimington Trophy Award winner, given annually to the nation’s top center ... a consensus first team All-America selection, earning first-team honors from Walter Camp, USA Today, Sporting News, the FWAA and the AFCA ... selected as a second team All-American by the Associated Press … selected to the All-SEC First Team by the conference coaches and the Associated Press ... SEC Scholar Athlete of the Year ... received the Jacobs Blocking Trophy as the conference’s top lineman from the SEC ... semifinalist for the Outland Trophy, which is presented the nation’s top interior lineman, and is a semifinalist for the Campbell Award ... midseason All-American by USA Today … led a line that opened holes for 199.9 rushing yards per game and ranked 32nd nationally (third in the SEC) ... finished with an average grade of 88.4 percent, including five games above 90 percent … did not surrender a sack on the season and allowed only four hurries … missed only eight assignments in 1,012 snaps for a success rate of 99.2 percent … had 20 knockdown blocks on the year ... committed just one penalty in 1,012 snaps with no holding calls … blocked for 10 100-yard rushers this season and 26 in his career that spanned 36 starts and 46 games ... blocked for four 200-yard rushing games for Derrick Henry in 2015, which tied an SEC record held by Herschel Walker and Bo Jackson … earned player of the week accolades from the Tide coaching staff following the Wisconsin, Georgia, Tennessee, LSU, Charleston Southern and Auburn games … named the SEC Offensive Lineman of the Week following the LSU game.

His consistency has been his best asset this year. "We've got nine new guys starting on the offense," Kelly said. "So being the oldest guy with the most experience I knew I had to bring it week-in and week-out. And be as good as I could because a lot of the younger guys were going to be watching that and kind of feed off that." He has the speed and quickness of Alex Mack, but plays stronger.  He has the physicality and smarts of Ryan Mangold, but is bigger. And has the must-have game to game and play after play consistency of the great ones:

Wisconsin: Graded out at 88 percent as the Crimson Tide rushed for 238 yards and accounted for 502 yards of total offense ... did not surrender a sack or a hurry ... blocked for a career-best 147 yards by Henry. Middle Tennessee: Had one knockdown block and a team-high grade of 87 percent against the Blue Raiders ... opened holes for the Tide to rush for 220 yards (5.6 per carry) and total 532 yards of offense. Ole Miss: Blocked for 503 yards of total offense while opening holes for 215 rushing, including 127 by Henry ... the line as a whole allowed only one sack in 59 pass attempts ... graded out at 86 percent. ULM: Started and graded out at 84 percent with only one missed assignment ... did not allow a sack and helped the Tide generate 34 points on offense. Georgia: Started and blocked for 379 yards of total offense while opening holes for 189 rushing yards, including a career-high 148 by Henry ... did not allow a sack and earned Offensive Player of the Week honors from the coaching staff after grading out at 92 percent, with two knockdown blocks ... did not have a missed assignment or a penalty. Arkansas: Opened holes for 95 rushing yards by Henry ... did not allow a sack or miss an assignment in the Tide’s 27-14 win ... graded out at 84 percent for the game. Texas A&M: Blocked for 258 yards rushing, including 236 yards by Henry, which was the fourth-highest single-game rushing total in school history ... graded out at a team-high 90 percent ... had two knockdown blocks ... did not surrender a sack or a quarterback hurry ... the line as a whole allowed only one sack to an Aggies’ team that enter the game averaging almost four sacks per game that led the SEC. Tennessee: Opened holes for 143 yards rushing by Henry ... did not allow a sack and missed just one assignment ... graded out at a team-high 88 percent ... had one knockdown block. LSU: Cleared a path for 210 rushing yards from Derrick Henry and 250 for the team … earned SEC Offensive Lineman of the Week and Alabama Offensive Player of the Week accolades for his efforts … matched a season-high, grading of 92 percent … did not allow a sack or a hurry and was not called for a penalty … spearheaded the game’s final drive that covered the final 9:18 of the game and saw the Crimson Tide cover 78 yards in 13 plays highlighted by nine rushes from Henry for 71 yards. Mississippi State: Graded out at 90 percent ... had one knockdown block and did not allow a sack ... opened holes for 235 yards rushing as Henry went over 200 yards (204) for the second straight week. Charleston Southern: Graded out at 88 percent and had one knockdown block as the starter left the game in the second quarter in a 56-6 win … played 29 snaps and had one knockdown block … earned Offensive Player of the Week honors from the Alabama coaching staff. Auburn: Earned Alabama Offensive Player of the Week honors for his efforts against the Tigers in a 29-13 win on the Plains … graded out at 90 percent with one knockdown block … did not have a missed assignment in 78 snaps … did not allow a sack or a hurry … opened holes for 271 rushing yards by Henry. Florida: Cleared a path for 233 rushing yards, including 189 and a touchdown by Henry … did not allow a sack or a hurry … graded out at 89 percent with two knockdown blocks … did not miss an assignment … provided time for Coker to complete 69.2 percent of his passes for 204 yards and two touchdowns. Michigan State: Graded out at a team-high 89 percent ... provided time for Coker to complete 25-of-31 passes for a career-high 286 yards and two scores ... opened holes for 154 rushing yards ... did not allow a sack or a hurry ... had two knockdown blocks. Clemson: Provided time for 335 yards passing from Jake Coker and 158 yards rushing from Derrick Henry ... did not allow a sack or commit a penalty ... had two knockdown blocks.

When no one rushes his lane. He can turn and double on the DT, and pop him to the ground with a nice violent shove. He had 778 plays from scrimmage last year. "It’s a cliché here, but it is the process," Kelly said. "Everyone wants to talk about it, but it’s the real thing. No matter who you bring in, we aren’t going to change our standards for who you are. This is the Bama Way. This is a special place. It’s not for everybody to come to. I think that is one of the biggest things Coach Saban has drilled in is that if you come here, you are a part of something bigger than you. Every guy who has had success here has partaken in that." He has some of the heaviest hands in the Draft.

He has such great balance in his feet when he is getting shoved backwards in pass pro. He instinctual reanchors and digs down and stops the forward movement again and again. He won the Remington as the best OC in all the land. "Very excited," Henry said about his buddy winning the Remington. "He's a great leader and the heart and soul of the offense." Henry should be excited. You can see him looking for #70 on almost every play as soon as he gets the ball in his gut and takes off up field. "Very solid player," Savage said. "Smart with balance and toughness. Definitely a potential starter [on the next level]." He is so good at combo blocking thorough the DT. He shoves the DT into the block of either guard, and impacts the linebacker out of the play as well.

He is such a great awkward blocker, and what I mean by that is that plays don't always go perfectly, especially inside the box. Interior O-linemen often get twisted, banged, and shoved off balance or out of position, and they have to be able to still block their defender. You have to be prepared for anything on the field. "All the success, the way he recruits you can’t get around [it], the hard work, the dedication, and he’s taught me to be a good person as well," Kelly said about Saban. "It has been incredible. When I first signed up, I never really knew just how fast and detail-oriented [he is]. How he goes about his day. It has made me the man I am today." You have to be prepared for anything in life, just like on the field.

Winning the Remington is a big deal. It also includes being a student athlete and how the player does in the class room as well. "It was huge," Kelly said about winning the Remington. "I never came into college hoping to win it or anything, but ultimately, just like anything else in sports, any football award given out, it’s not won single-handedly. I have a lot of great guys who I played with day in and day out who helped me win that trophy. All four guys who I play with on the offensive line won that award vicariously through me. It was an honor to get up there. It was great too because Dave Rimington does a lot for the Boomer Esiason Foundation, and it was just an awesome event. There have been a lot of great players that have come before me that have won that trophy, and to be a part of that was the most satisfying thing. It was awesome." He excelled on the field, and even more in the class room.

He is such a great blocker when everything goes wrong. Even if it is just to stick a hand in the D-Tackle's chest until he falls down. When he gets hit from the side and knocked off balance, he is still as terrific blocker. It is the same in life. He got up and got his bachelor's degree, and is almost done with his Master's.

He was a true student athlete. "People take 'student-athlete' for granted sometimes," Kelly said. "They give more balance to the athlete side than the student part, and ultimately, no matter what level you are, if something happens and your time is up, you can’t play football anymore, that’s going to come back to you. Jon Dever, who was hired by Coach Saban, did a great job of providing tutors, always into the details of our academic portfolios and what we had coming up. I’m not the smartest guy in the world, but I was there all summer. I applied myself and used all the resources available to me and was able to get two degrees, an undergrad and master's degree, which is another thing that will help me. Way down the road hopefully after a career in the NFL." He carried those study skills, work ethic, and smarts to the field, and was the clear leader of the O-line. An NFL OC has have top leadership and communication skills. 

He is also a three time FBS Champion. "I think it was more special because I was actually starting," Kelly said. " As much as it’s incredible to win three national championships and to even be a part of a team that was able to do that, a lot of the guys on our team this year felt that we hadn’t really contributed a whole lot to those championships in the past (2011 and 2012). We were still part of it, but it didn’t mean as much as this one did because we weren’t really contributing on the field except in a practice sense. I think this year’s was even more special because of the adversity the team went through. Losing Week 3 to Ole Miss really put us in a bind and tested our strength and commitment as a team, and from Week 3 to the end, we were always playing elimination games. Week in and week out we had to win, because if we didn’t, the ultimate goal would have been lost." He has the smarts to be the main communicator on any O-line. He has elite smarts and communication skills. And the Center position is a communication position.

Now all's he has to do is prepare for the Draft and the NFL. "It’s kind of different because one second you are going 100 miles per hour as a student-athlete, and then you’ve got to decompress and then train up again because teams that played late in January," Kelly said. "We’re kind of short on time compared to other teams getting ready for the next level. As soon as we won the national championship, it’s kind of like you put that in the rear-view mirror because you’re moving so fast now. It’s just a whole different chapter in your life. You have a structure for five years at Alabama, and now you’re kind of your own enterprise. It’s going to be challenging. There’s good days and bad days, hard workouts, but ultimately, you’ve got to make it count because you only get this chance once." He is just one of those guys that will succeed at anything he does.

Additional Notes:

LSU: He has nice feet moving to the second level, and can pick up the blitzer inside, and still get outside to block on the bubble screen. He is not the niftiest athlete, but he can put his head down and run very well when he has to. He does a nice job bursting off the line into the DT, and then grabbing his shirt and holding him in place on the play action. He really looks like he is run blocking at first on play actions, and then he has his hands in the DT's shirt, and he just dances with him at the LOS.

A&M: Incredible in pass pro. He is so comfortable sitting back in pass pro, and always seems in balance. He short sets with great knee bend, and does a great job using his hands to push the rusher up. It make it so hard rush when you are up so high. He has heavy hands that jolts rushes off balance. He does such a great job absorbing the initial burst, and then stopping the rush with his hands. His technique is flawless in pass pro. He can look like he is making a teaching video sometimes, on how to pass protect from the Center position. And he is so strong moving backwards.

GeorgiaGreat heavy hands that he using in pass pro and in the run. You can see DT's shoulders snap backward with some suddenness, when he hits them with his hands while exploding forward with his legs. He is one of the most powerful inside blockers I have ever seen. I have no doubt that he can play OG as well. He has great size, and could move over to the left or right guard. But he also is such a valuable asset as the communicator of the O-line at OC. He makes all the checks and calls. Directs traffic, and points out assignments on the line. He always seems to know what is going on the play.

Michigan StateHe is so tough moving forward. He turns every run play into a fight. He loves to grab the DT's shirt and try to twist him to the ground with upper body power and hip torque. Vicious on double team block on DT. He makes their heads rock violent when he hits them in the side, and then slides off the second level to hit a linebacker. This guys loves to hit defenders. He makes more head rocking block inside than any Center I have ever seen.

Drake and Kelly Vs Wisconsin:

You can see here they like to use Drake in a ton of different roles. Including as the outside runner. Henry runs almost exclusively between the tackles. Drake fills just about every other role. They run off tackle here, from a stacked up Singleback. He just gets tripped up from behind. You can see Kelly making the checks and calls. I love this block by Kelly. He bursts off the snap into the NT. Then the OLG slams into Kelly on the double team, and knocks him sideways and almost off his block. But watch how he holds onto the block by keeping one hand in the NT's chest and continues pushing him into an awkward position (:01). This is interesting. Drake shifts outside and lines up all the way outside like a split end when Alabama goes Empty (:11). Kelly hits Coker right in the hands. Then watch him shift to the right inside. He easily takes out the blitzer. But then watch him slide off, and get outside. He makes the jab block that allows the WR to pick up the first down.

They run on a smash. Watch Drake's quick feet as he heads to t he line. He is so shifty. He moves his shoulders like he is going inside and then bounces it outside with enough lateral burst to make the LB miss. Then he heads up field. I love how he runs with that herky jerky motion. He sees the guy coming from the inside. But he gets the 1st down first, and then tries to get outside the WRs block to reach the sideline (:26). Kelly is so quick to the second level to get the ILB. Watch how fast he gets out there. He actually gets out there too fast, and overruns the ILB. But he is able to stop and get his hands on him just long enough so that he can't get in on the play (:40). He makes one guy miss as he break outside. You can see that the defense knows that when Drake is in, he is running outside. They have seven guys out in the flat by the time he is tackled.

Oops, play action into blitz pick up and Drake misses the block. That is not good. Kelly tries to power into the D-end like he is run blocking. and then all the blockers just kind of stop. They clearly were expecting the ball to be gone off the play action (1:01). Kelly double teams the NT back with the ORG, and turns it into a fist fight in the middle of the maelstrom (1:16). Drake bolts to the line. Look at the nice ball security. He cuts to the left a little, and then lowers his head and slams into the pile. That is a nice run for the big 3rd down back. Everyone seems to forget that he is 210 pounds. He looks small next to Henry, but he is not a small 3rd down back.

Kelly gets off the line with some aggression on the play action. Then holds his position nicely as the run block turns into pass pro (1:22). Kelly jams the NT, and lets him slide off on the screen. But it is a little too cute, and NT reads the screen. Drakes gets stuck in traffic, and Coker has to throw it too early because of the blitzer (1:32). They give it to Drake on a zone run. He acts like he is heading outside. Then he cuts up field behind the OLG, and he gets killed (1:40). Kelly and the OLT double team the NT and destroy him.

Kelly, Drake, and the OLG set up the screen nicely. This is were you want to see some of Drakes dynamic speed. He finally has room to use it. He turns and sees the OLG turned sideways with his butt to the sideline, and no one behind him. He doesn't play, or fake, or waste any herky-jerky motion. He just takes off to the sideline behind the OLG Then watch the patience as he slows to set up the WR's block with a defender getting close to him. He sneaks past #5, slows, and cuts back behind #3's block. Fakes inside to freeze the CB for a split second. He picks up the 1st down, and runs over the CB. He finally gets knocked out of bounds after he pick up a 2nd and 22. That was a great run by Drake (1:48). You get a nice look at Kelly over running the DB on the second level, but he slams on the brakes and holds him up just enough to let Drake get away (2:02). When you give Drake some space, and he can turn it into a kick return, he is just a beast.

You get a great look at Kelly picking up the blitzer. Okay, here we go! Here is Drake blocking off the play action. He does a great job getting low and wide so the blitzer has to get through him. Then gives him a nice two handed jam up. That was a great block by Drake (2:12). Kelly is so smooth moving backwards. Then his hands start flashing out and things get rough. I think he is an NFL pass protector already (2:20). I love this play by Drake. Watch him get the outside shoulder of the linebacker on the out and up. He is open for a split second, but Coker goes to the underneath guy. Watch Drake in the endzone after #8 catches the ball. Watch the block in the endzone that allows #8 to skip into the endzone untouched. That is a great block by Drake, and great team work.

Just watch Kelly turn and smash into the DT. He pops him back a yard, right off first contact. Then it turns into a rugby scrum. Meanwhile, Drake bursts outside and makes the D-end miss with his speed. He fakes inside, and then watch the hop outside. He makes the defender fall to the ground. But the defender is just able to reach up and grab his feet. But Drake rips his feet out and dives for three (2:44). It's another underneath Draw, with three defenders in the backfield again. Watch the burst once the ball is in his gut as he flies past the three stogies. Then the speed outside. He tries to bend around the DB just past the Flat, but can't juke him. He sometimes runs too fast to juke guys (2:59). Kelly is so good at combo blocking. He is the best OC in this Draft with the Combo block. Watch the power as he slams into the 5-tech, and knocks him into the ORG's block. Then he is instantly into the ILB, and punching him backwards.

Drake goes in motion and takes the jet sweep. He splits the blockers, and then follows #2. He uses some quickness and explosion to make a guy miss, which is nice. Anytime he makes a guy miss with quickness it is a bonus. Then he turns the corner, and it is a kick return, where h is speed is always at its best. Watch how quickly Kelly bursts off the snap, and gets into position to seal the ILB. He really has some great movement skills getting to the second level (3:09). They run the jet sweep again. It is well block enough for Drake to get to full speed. He can use his feet a little at full speed, and you can see the two quick shifty cuts. But he can't do much m ore at full speed. But they block the edge well. He uses his great speed to get to the edge, and turns the corner. Then he runs out of room on the sideline. You can see on the replay how he struggles to turn that corner at full speed a little.

You get another great look of Drake blocking in pass pro. He takes the fake hand off, and then jams the rusher right in the gut with his shoulder pad. Kelly shuffles nicely to the left. Then grabs the rusher, and the rush is done (3:56). When he is not sprinting at full speed, he can show some great lateral burst sometimes. Watch this wiggle, and then burst outside. He breaks #48's ankle. Then he can just turn on the speed. You get a great look at Kelly just overwhelming the DT. He knocks him four yards backwards (4:03). You get a great look at the wiggle and the straight arm that set him free outside (4:14). You also get a nice look at the DT getting twisted back by Kelly.

Drake does a good job running with his eyes. He breaks inside, and sees the ORG pulling to the right. Watch this nice cut inside to follow the ORG. That is an NFL run right there. He also shows some power getting extra yards through three guys. I love this block by Kelly. Watch him turn, slide, and push the NT into the ORG. Then he shuffles to the second level and seals the ILB inside (4:31). Holy crap! Talk about running into a wall, LOL. That was the toughest yard he ever gained (4:41). Kelly slams into the NT, and zone blocks him to the right. See how he keeps him moving down the line with his inside hand (4:48). Drakes runs a great play action fake that fooled me. I thought he had the ball in his hands slashing through the line.

I still say he is an excellent receiver coming out of the backfield. Watch him slip out of the backfield and get the outside shoulder of the linebacker. Coker throws the back shoulder fade. Watch this great adjustment to the ball. He couldn't bring it in, but that was one hell of a reaction to t he ball in the air. Kelly doesn't have anyone rush his lane. So he turns and pancakes the NT (5:01). I like how Kelly hunts down the linebacker on the second level and pushes him further away from the play. Watch this great run by Drake. He rams up the middle on the Draw with both hands on the ball. He gets popped back by the D-linemen. Watch the great balance as he hops back, turns, and takes off like a rocket outside, and he is gone (5:08). You get a great look at the great escape from Drake here. He has two guy grabbing him, and twist and turns, and hops himself out of the tackle (5:54). Then it is just speed. He is always at his best when he can just use his speed. 

Drake and Kelly Vs Wisconsin:

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=jR5wo2xfFQU

 

Henry and Kelly Vs Wisconsin:

Henry runs up in an I-shotgun, and just runs a dive. Watch the subtle fake right and break left. Then he slashes behind Kelly. Here is a play that shows some of things we have never seen since Earl and Brown. He runs through the diving arm tackle of one ILB, and slams into the other ILB. As the first ILB spins in the air because he was foolish enough to try and grab his thigh, watch the second ILB bounce off his helmet, and stumble sideways to the ground. He hurts defenders when he runs (:01). Kelly #70 hikes the ball, and then gets his arms up quickly into the NT. He double teams the NT with the ORG, and watch Kelly punch the NT back and off balance as the ORG pushes him as well. He has some of the heaviest hands I have ever seen. But what makes him special, is what happens next. The ORG skips off and goes to the second level. Watch Kelly grab the NT, and twist and bend him awkwardly around until he trips over another teammate. I should stop this tape right here. It really doesn't get any better than this. 

Kelly gets low, digs low, and gets underneath the NT again. Watch the NT jolt backward, and then the ORG hits him and he gets jolted backwards again. Then he turns and punches the ILB up and back. They run a Draw to Henry. He doesn't always show great burst once the ball is in his gut, and gets hit at the LOS. But watch the power as he runs though D-end for five yards (:09). Here he is in a power Singleback on 3rd and 2, and everyone knows he is getting the ball. You can say what you want, but he gets the ball in his gut, reads the blocks, and cuts to the left with some excellent speed. Oh, and he falls forward for five again (:17). Watch Kelly grab the NT, but the NT gets leverage on him. Kelly lost the initial fight by getting too high. But watch the odd arm twist, like he is trying to elbow him. Then he twists him to the left with all upper body power. The ORG comes over to help, but Kelly is already twisting him out of the play. So the ORG turns through the hole in front of Henry. Damn I though this would be a wicked quick Tape. I'm still only 20-seconds into it, LOL. Oh well, at least the opening I wrote for this Tape turned into the hyperbolic intro for the whole Tape.

He gets the ball, and watch the great quick burst to the left. He saw the D-end breaking free inside, and didn't adjust for Howard's crack back block. That is a nice initial burst once the ball is in his gut. However, three defenders break free right in front of him and he gets hit at the line. But he is still able to spin forward for two yards (:22). Kelly tries to twist the NT out of the way again with his hands, but the NT fights back. So Kelly ends up twisting both to the ground. Even when his technique fails, his hands and power are strong enough to twist the NT to the ground.

Now, in order to play RB in the NFL you have to be able to block. Henry is the best 3rd down back in this Draft. He can catch the ball like a WR. But watch him block here. He gets the play action, and watch the D-end burst past the OLT. Henry slams him with his hands and knocks him two yards sideways. The D-end recovers so he punches him to the ground. I don't understand this play. Henry almost knocked him down with the first hit. Then knocked him down with the second hit, and he still sacked the QB (:29). Watch Kelly sink his knees. Grab the rushers shirt, and push him up as he stones him. You cannot have better technique pass blocking inside. That play should be watched by any kid who wants to play OC.

So you thought I was exaggerating how he can catch the ball like a WR. Watch him hop up, and reach up over his head and catch the ball as naturally as anyone in the Draft. Now he is out in space with the ball in his hands. Kelly gets in a little trouble on this play. The NT gets under him again, only this lime he extends his arms and bends him backwards. He has totally beat Kelly, but is still only able to bend him back less than three yards in pass pro (:35). Kelly is great on this play. Watch him blast off the snap and slam the NT back and sideways like a rag doll. Then he turns and hits the ILB, and takes him out as well (:46). I know Henry is slow, and doesn't have a great initial burst once the ball is in his gut, but watch him cut to the left. Then burst to the right. Then through the NT and with the slowest of speed, I have ever seen burst to the second level. He is being chased by a Safety. So you know some one as slow as him is going to be caught from behind. Oh yeah, Derrick Henry never gets caught from behind. "All I need is a line, and I'm good," Henry said.

He gets the ball heading to the left. He immediately gives a single shimmy and cuts to the left behind Howard. He finds a lane to the safety. You can see him at the LOS, already with his head up reading the block of Howard. Howard jams the safety with his inside shoulder. So Henry cuts to his outside shoulder, and gets tackled from the side. If Howard had hit the safety with his other shoulder, Henry could have gotten outside and would still be running (1:00). Kelly just does what he does. He powers into the NT, and gets him moving backwards. The ORG hits him sideways, and Kelly drags him out of the play.

Okay, here he is with four defenders in the backfield. He has no room and nowhere to go. Neither would any other RB in this Draft. But because of his size and power he is able to fall forward through three defenders to reach the LOS. That is a good run. I know it is impossible to believe, but even Jim Brown and Earl Campbell got tackled in the backfield upon occasion. That play was not a failure by Henry. It was a failure by his blockers (1:07). Kelly is about the only guy who makes a block on this play. He always does such a nice job getting his hands out and moving up into the NT off the snap. Then he uses his legs to power him back and too the side. That is a great power block.

When his blockers do their jobs, he is slashing through the LOS like an angry runaway train. Watch the quick stall, as he gives #71 time to reach the D-line past him, and then the great burst behind that block. Then he is tripped up at 20, and falls down on the 24 (1:12). Kelly is just so good moving forward. He is elite moving backwards in pass pro as well, but he is so much fun to watch bending, twisting, and powering defenders backwards. Watch him shove the DT sideways two yards, so he is on the wrong side of the ORG. Then he gets to the ILB on the second level and takes him out of the play as well. He is so good in the run game.

Watch the great burst through the line. It looked he was going to thunder for another long TD, but just gets tripped up at the end. That is great speed and burst through the hole. He flashes to the second level faster than any guy his size should be able to. He is so good at falling forward. It seems he falls forward for four or five yards every time instead of one or two. Here he is flying forward, as he falls forward for four extra yards again (1:18). Kelly does that chicken wing thing again. He pops into the NT and gets him moving to the right. Kelly grabs his shirt, and keeps him going sideways with his inside arm that looks like he is trying to elbow him. Notice how often Henry cuts behind Kelly's block. It seems like every run he he has his eyes up looking for #70.

Ironically, Kelly doesn't have a great block on this play. He gets his hand on the D-linemen, and the OLG destroys him. Kelly is left looking for someone to block (1:25). Henry makes one guy miss in the backfield, with his burst once the QB put the ball in his gut. Then he reads the blocks, and cuts back behind he block of Howard. Makes #6 and #19 miss on the second level with his impressive speed, and he is gone. And he never gets caught from behind by puny humans. Despite h is obvious lack of speed.

Here is Henry in pass pro again. He spots the late blitzer late, and uses his hands and feet to violently shove him past the QB. If he didn't need to rest, he could be the best 3rd down back in the NFL (1:36). We have all seen how Kelly is the elite run blocking OC in this Draft. Just watching Henry look for him as he runs to the line, and cuts off his block 90% of the time is proof enough. But we have only seen two pass blocks on this Tape. While he was perfect in those blocks it was still a small sample size. Here he does another important thing in pass pro. No one rushes his lane, so he drops back looking to his left to make sure the ORG is okay. Then he see his OLG is in trouble. So he turns and stones the rusher his his hands, and stops him instantly. That is another example of elite pass pro by an OC. He is a 1st Round pick.

Henry runs up to the line with nothing and no hole. So he lowers his head to move the pile, and then bursts out the other side for a very impressive five yards. It is amazing how he falls forward for four of five yards every time. This play is really stuffed. But watch Kelly power into the NT, and keep fighting and twisting him backwards with amazing power and tenacity. I know the Pats currently have five Centers on their roster, but could we get him (1:41), please? Kelly burst into the NT, and they stalemate each other. Then the ORG slams over and knocks both of them down. I don't know who the ORG is, but I'm starting to like him too (1:48). Henry charges into the hole. You can see two Wisconsin linemen fill the hole. Watch the great lateral burst that makes one defender fall on his face, and other stagger aimlessly forward like he is drunk. Then with the great Jim Brown like speed through traffic, he almost runs right through five defenders for the TD. 

Is their anyone on this green Earth that doesn't know Henry isn't running the ball up the gut here? No! Two elite lateral bursts at t he LOS. First the cut left behind the crack back block of the tight end. Then the cut up field with a stunning burst forward as he hops over some trash and is crashing into the Endzone like a run away train at the end of the line (1:54). And like it matters, but there is Kelly fighting between two defenders to help keep them off the line, and then getting to the second level to a third defender, as he pushes the ILB into the Endzone. If those two guys aren't lock 1st Round Picks, than my name is Earl Brown.

As NFL defenses get smaller and smaller to stop the wacky passing games, they also get faster and faster. When NFL teams run now a days, they are running more and more between the Tackles, because the outside speed of NFL defenses is so good. Derrick Henry has been the best runner between the tackles the past two year in the FBS. When teams run now a days, they run Dives and Smashes over 75% of the time. That's Henry's game. And when they aren't running Smashes and Dives 74% of the time or more (yes that was a typo but I though it was funny), they are running Zone blocking schemes and letting the RB cutback, 90% of the time between the Tackles on zone blocking schemed plays, like Alabama likes to do as well. He is like the Jolly Green Giant, when teams seem to be looking for Little Green Sprout (LOL, did they play a commercial before the commercial). But the way the NFL is forced to run inside now a days, because of all the speed on defense, is what Henry does best.

Henry and Kelly Vs Wisconsin:

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=H4OZ-cHmXVk

 

#

Kelly's Official Bio:

SENIOR (2015): A three-year starter at center and the Crimson Tide’s signal-calling anchor ... named the Rimington Trophy Award winner, given annually to the nation’s top center ... a consensus first team All-America selection, earning first-team honors from Walter Camp, USA Today, Sporting News, the FWAA and the AFCA ... selected as a second team All-American by the Associated Press … selected to the All-SEC First Team by the conference coaches and the Associated Press ... SEC Scholar Athlete of the Year ... received the Jacobs Blocking Trophy as the conference’s top lineman from the SEC ... semifinalist for the Outland Trophy, which is presented the nation’s top interior lineman, and is a semifinalist for the Campbell Award ... midseason All-American by USA Today … led a line that opened holes for 199.9 rushing yards per game and ranked 32nd nationally (third in the SEC) ... finished with an average grade of 88.4 percent, including five games above 90 percent … did not surrender a sack on the season and allowed only four hurries … missed only eight assignments in 1,012 snaps for a success rate of 99.2 percent … had 20 knockdown blocks on the year ... committed just one penalty in 1,012 snaps with no holding calls … blocked for 10 100-yard rushers this season and 26 in his career that spanned 36 starts and 46 games ... blocked for four 200-yard rushing games for Derrick Henry in 2015, which tied an SEC record held by Herschel Walker and Bo Jackson … earned player of the week accolades from the Tide coaching staff following the Wisconsin, Georgia, Tennessee, LSU, Charleston Southern and Auburn games … named the SEC Offensive Lineman of the Week following the LSU game. Wisconsin: Graded out at 88 percent as the Crimson Tide rushed for 238 yards and accounted for 502 yards of total offense ... did not surrender a sack or a hurry ... blocked for a career-best 147 yards by Henry. Middle Tennessee: Had one knockdown block and a team-high grade of 87 percent against the Blue Raiders ... opened holes for the Tide to rush for 220 yards (5.6 per carry) and total 532 yards of offense. Ole Miss: Blocked for 503 yards of total offense while opening holes for 215 rushing, including 127 by Henry ... the line as a whole allowed only one sack in 59 pass attempts ... graded out at 86 percent. ULM: Started and graded out at 84 percent with only one missed assignment ... did not allow a sack and helped the Tide generate 34 points on offense. Georgia: Started and blocked for 379 yards of total offense while opening holes for 189 rushing yards, including a career-high 148 by Henry ... did not allow a sack and earned Offensive Player of the Week honors from the coaching staff after grading out at 92 percent, with two knockdown blocks ... did not have a missed assignment or a penalty. Arkansas: Opened holes for 95 rushing yards by Henry ... did not allow a sack or miss an assignment in the Tide’s 27-14 win ... graded out at 84 percent for the game. Texas A&M: Blocked for 258 yards rushing, including 236 yards by Henry, which was the fourth-highest single-game rushing total in school history ... graded out at a team-high 90 percent ... had two knockdown blocks ... did not surrender a sack or a quarterback hurry ... the line as a whole allowed only one sack to an Aggies’ team that enter the game averaging almost four sacks per game that led the SEC. Tennessee: Opened holes for 143 yards rushing by Henry ... did not allow a sack and missed just one assignment ... graded out at a team-high 88 percent ... had one knockdown block.LSU: Cleared a path for 210 rushing yards from Derrick Henry and 250 for the team … earned SEC Offensive Lineman of the Week and Alabama Offensive Player of the Week accolades for his efforts … matched a season-high, grading of 92 percent … did not allow a sack or a hurry and was not called for a penalty … spearheaded the game’s final drive that covered the final 9:18 of the game and saw the Crimson Tide cover 78 yards in 13 plays highlighted by nine rushes from Henry for 71 yards. Mississippi State: Graded out at 90 percent ... had one knockdown block and did not allow a sack ... opened holes for 235 yards rushing as Henry went over 200 yards (204) for the second straight week. Charleston Southern: Graded out at 88 percent and had one knockdown block as the starter left the game in the second quarter in a 56-6 win … played 29 snaps and had one knockdown block … earned Offensive Player of the Week honors from the Alabama coaching staff. Auburn: Earned Alabama Offensive Player of the Week honors for his efforts against the Tigers in a 29-13 win on the Plains … graded out at 90 percent with one knockdown block … did not have a missed assignment in 78 snaps … did not allow a sack or a hurry … opened holes for 271 rushing yards by Henry. Florida: Cleared a path for 233 rushing yards, including 189 and a touchdown by Henry … did not allow a sack or a hurry … graded out at 89 percent with two knockdown blocks … did not miss an assignment … provided time for Coker to complete 69.2 percent of his passes for 204 yards and two touchdowns.Michigan State: Graded out at a team-high 89 percent ... provided time for Coker to complete 25-of-31 passes for a career-high 286 yards and two scores ... opened holes for 154 rushing yards ... did not allow a sack or a hurry ... had two knockdown blocks. Clemson: Provided time for 335 yards passing from Jake Coker and 158 yards rushing from Derrick Henry ... did not allow a sack or commit a penalty ... had two knockdown blocks.

JUNIOR (2014):
 A second-year starter at center who made all calls and anchored the Crimson Tide's offensive line ... a member of the Rimington Trophy watch list ... started 12 games at center and helped lead an offensive line that averaged 206.6 yards rushing per game, which ranked seventh in the SEC and 30th nationally ... the line surrendered just 16 sacks on the season to rank second in the SEC and 14th nationally (1.14 per game) ... blocked for 484.5 yards of total offense per game (third in the SEC and 17th nationally) ... missed just seven assignments in 806 snaps on the year for a 99.1 percent success rate ... did not allow a sack ... blocked for six 100-yard rushers in 2014 and 16 in his starting career ... selected as Alabama's Offensive Player of the Week at Tennessee and against Western Carolina. West Virginia: Opened holes for two 100-yard rushers as T.J. Yeldon went for 126 yards and two touchdowns and Derrick Henry added 113 yards and one score ... blocked for 538 yards of total offense with no sacks allowed. FAU: Graded out at a team-best 93 percent with one knockdown block and no missed assignments ... opened holes for 190 yards on the ground while providing time for 430 yards through the air, which is the second-most yards in school history ... did not allow a sack in 38 pass attempts. Southern Miss: Did not miss an assignment and helped the Tide roll up 333 yards on the ground and 546 yards of total offense ... had two knockdown blocks. Florida: Blocked for the second-most yards in school history as the Crimson Tide compiled 672 total yards, including 449 in the air and 223 on the ground ... blocked for his third 100-yard rushing game of the season as Henry gained 111 yards on 20 carries ... had two knockdown blocks and played 90 snaps. Ole Miss: Helped Alabama rush for 168 yards and pass for 228 in a loss at Ole Miss ... left the game in the second quarter with a sprained knee. Tennessee: Returned to the starting lineup after missing two weeks with a knee injury ... graded out at a team-high 89 percent and added two knockdown blocks ... earned Offensive Player of the Week honors from the Tide coaching staff. LSU: Recorded two knockdown blocks and graded out at 92 percent as Alabama drove for the game-tying field goal with 50 seconds remaining and won in overtime ... did not allow a sack.Mississippi State: Graded out at 88 percent with one knockdown block ... opened holes against one of the stoutest defensive lines in the nation in the No. 1 Bulldogs ... did not allow a sack and helped open numerous rushing lanes on the game-clinching drive in the fourth quarter that ended with a seven-yard touchdown run by T.J. Yeldon. Western Carolina: Helped open holes for 275 yards on the ground ... provided time for 337 yards passing while not allowing a sack ... had two knockdown blocks and graded out at 92 percent ... named Alabama's Offensive Player of the Week.Auburn: Graded out at 88 percent and helped open holes and provide time for 539 yards of total offense, including 227 yards on the ground. Missouri: Opened holes for 242 rushing yards, including 141 by Henry ... provided time for 262 passing yards and 504 yards of total offense, the most allowed by the Tigers' defense in 2014. Ohio State: Graded out at a team-high 87 percent with no missed assignments ... did not allow a sack and provided time for 407 yards of total offense.

SOPHOMORE (2013): Took over the starting duties at center for departed All-American Barrett Jones ... started nine games and was responsible for line calls and adjustments along an offensive front that ranked 23rd nationally and fourth in the SEC for fewest sacks allowed per game (1.31) ... blocked for 205.6 yards per game on the ground (25th nationally and fourth in the SEC) while helping account for 248.5 yards through the air for 454.1 yards of total offense (33rd nationally) that ranked as the second-most in a single season in Alabama history. Virginia Tech: Made his first career start. Texas A&M: Helped the offensive line establish an identity as the Tide rushed for 234 yards and passed for 334 yards ... recorded one knockdown block. Colorado State: Provided time for AJ McCarron to complete 77 percent of his passes for 258 yards. Ole Miss: Played most of the first half before suffering a stretched MCL. Tennessee: Returned to the starting lineup and helped the Crimson Tide rush for 204 yards while providing time for McCarron to throw for 275.LSU: Helped open holes for 133 yards on the ground by T.J. Yeldon and 193 total rushing yards against the Tigers ... did not allow a sack. Mississippi State: Part of line that cleared a path for 160 yards rushing by Yeldon ... did not allow a sack. Chattanooga: Helped open holes for 435 yards of offense including 251 yards on the ground ... graded out at 93 percent. Auburn: Injured his knee in practice leading up to the game and did not play. Oklahoma: Graded out as the Tide's best offensive lineman against the Sooners at 90 percent with a knockdown block and no sacks allowed.

REDSHIRT FRESHMAN (2012): Came off the bench to play in 10 games at center ... named to the SEC All-Freshman team.

FRESHMAN (2011): Redshirted during his initial season at the Capstone.

PARTICIPATION G
2011 0
2012 10
2013 9
2014 12
2015 15
TOTAL 46

 

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