Josh Jackson- CB Iowa

3.95 SS!  6.86 3-Cone!

6-1, 192, (PD) 4.42-.45, 18 Reps,

10'3" Broad, 40" Vert, 

Plays Corner Like A WR. 

By TOM

With a 6.86 3-Cone at the Combine and a 3.95 Short Shuttle at his Proday, if he is on the Board at 31 (and maybe 23) he will be a Patriot. We all know they love the quickness, balance, COD, and agility drills the most. He also made a lot of money at his Proday. Most guys had him in the low 4.4's, and some in the 4.5s. If is very strange to see a range of stop watches go from 4.42-4.52? Which also shows the range of opinion teams have as him. Some see him as top 25, and some Day Two only.

So I think it's safe to say that a team that had him in the 4.42-.45 range is going to take him in the 1st. "I'm trying to stay focused and show them my knowledge of the game and that I know what I'm doing," Jackson said. "I'll keep training, get ready for the Draft, and be the best player and person I can be." On Tape he does not struggle with speed. 

CBs are like OLs, it is often more important how they move backwards and sidewards than forward, though at some point every DB will have to turn and bail to save a TD.  "It's sad not to be there, but it is also a good thing because I am achieving my dreams," Jackson said. "They don't know what the general managers are thinking. They are just predictions. You never know." He has the best feet moving backwards in Finesse Press. 

This is the player for Pats fans to watch. "It’s always a possibility," BB's buddy Kirk Ferentz said. "It's really nice in life when you get to do what you want to do. We don’t want anyone staying here if they aren’t fired up about that." His floor is 31, the Pats.  

He is better prospect than Desmond King (and I loved Desmond in the Draft). "Desmond was a different story," Iowa DC Parker said. "He doesn’t have the same dimensions (King is shorter and slower) and skill set that maybe Josh has. But Desmond has a lot more football instinct that maybe Josh has." Elite understanding of position and what he has to do on the field. 

He was a WR in high school, and has the ball skills of a WR. "He has all of the athletic ability," Parker said. "It takes some time when you’re in the secondary with the different coverages and schemes, zone or man, and I think that’s really helped him. The more he was involved in the game plan and seeing it, he improved every day. I think he has a lot more upside." Great quicks to stop and turn inside when the WR makes a great break inside.  

He led the nation with an incredible 18 Passes Broken Up. "He’s always been able to jump," his high school coach Young said. "I always thought when he went, he would end up being a receiver. Because he’s got such good ball skills." He has great ball skills for a CB, and can make the elite one-handed snag like a top WR.

Played more and more of the side-saddle technique where he watches the QB instead of just the WR this season. "I was surprised when he said that," Young said. "But he really thought he could [make it to the NFL]. That makes sense. That’s what the NFL wants, guys that look like him. Long guys with the ball skills that can cover." He does not get beat down the sideline.

Plays mainly on the QB's right. "You've just seen him grow with his role," Ferentz said. "But you never know where it's going to go and how well a guy will play. He's really had to work hard, and he has worked hard. And that's really the key. He's had good ability, but now he's really learned how to play a little bit, and that's a good combination." Plays Press and off with equal aplomb. 

He is one of those guys who looks faster and quicker than everyone else on the field. When the QB throws the ball he becomes a WR, and gets his hands on the ball. At least 26-times (led NCAA with 26 passes defended). He he got his hands on passes two times a game (13 games). Elite agility moving backwards and outside in coverage. He sees everything on his side of the field, and shuts it down. He is the as smart and aware as any CB in this Draft. Best eyes in the Draft to watch the QB and WR at the same time.

Overview: Led nation with eight interceptions . . . eight interceptions ties school single-season record (Desmond King, 2015, Lou King, 1981, Nile Kinnick, 1939) . . . had two interception returns for touchdowns (43, 52) at Wisconsin . . . only player in conference history with two scoring returns in a Big Ten game . . . two returns tied school single-game and season records . . . tied single game school record with three pass interceptions vs. Ohio State . . . also led the nation in passes defended (26), ranked second in interception return yards (168), and tied for second in touchdowns (2) . . . tied for fourth nationally in pass break-ups (18) . . . six total turnovers in consecutive games vs. Ohio State and Wisconsin, including five interceptions and one forced fumble . . . moved from defensive back to wide receiver during 2015 spring practice, before returning to defense in the fall.

Penn ST: He can play every kind of coverage with smarts, great eyes, and elite feet. Elite COD. He has a great burst forward and sideways out of his pedal. Great intelligence and awareness on the field. He sees and knows what an offense is doing quicker and faster than any other DB in this Draft. Those INTs and PBUs were not a mistake.

Northwestern: He plays with great techniques. He is the best Corner in this Draft eyeing the QB and the WR while flying down the sideline. Most CBs cannot focus on the QB while covering the WR. He has no problem keeping up with WRs, while looking back at the QB. Great eyes. He keeps his eyes on the QB, and knows what he is trying to do. Great speed. WR just never get behind him. Great job picking up the WR going to his side, and down his sideline. He reads quicker than anyone.

BC: He is terrific when he can just focus on one guy. He had the game winning INT against BC in the Bowl game. He has elite feet moving backwards. He has unbelievably quick feet he can use to weave back and forth while moving backwards to take the WR out of his release. Elite feet moving backwards. He can bob and weave in front of the WR moving backwards, and not let him off the line into his pattern. Nobody has better ball skills in this Draft. He was recruited to play WR at Iowa, and switch to Corner. 

Iowa State: He looks like a FS on the field sometimes. He will play in the NFL, because if he can't play Corner, he sure looked like a Free Safety against Iowa State. He has elite feet and instincts in coverage, and is said to be very smart, and studies his opponents. 

Started at cornerback in 44-41 OT win at Iowa State . . . set career-high for second straight week at Iowa State with six tackles, including four solo stops and two assists, along with a shared tackle for loss and three pass break-ups . . . also added one punt return for four yards.

Combine: I think he is the best CB moving backwards. "He was not good [at Combine]," a Scout said. "Scouts got him at 4.57 to 4.62. He looked stiff. If you’re taking him with a 1st-round pick, that's risky to me." He ran slower than I though at the Combine. 

I think if he is on the board at 31 he is a Patriot. He led the NCAAs in INTs with 8 and 18 PBU. He is one of the best movers on the field. He rarely turned and bailed down field. He was always in great position to see the QB, the ball, and the WR. Smart and well coached. He played WR, and when the ball was thrown to his side he played it like a WR. He can track the ball and catch it smoothly. He can leap up and snag it over the WR. 

Odd Forty time could drop him to the Pats at 31. Getting a 4.49 was huge for him, but then getting a 4.6 on his second run was confusing. He can play press like the Pats expect, but is better in Off. Quick feet. Great job opening hips. Smooth and easy hips. Tracked and caught the ball. He can really spot the ball in the air and go and get it. Struggled in W drill. 

2017: Started at cornerback in all 13 games . . . recorded 48 tackles, including 34 solo stops and 14 assists . . . collected eight interceptions, 168 return yards, and two touchdowns . . . also had 18 pass break-ups, one forced fumble and one blocked field goal . . . averaged 7.2 yards on five punt returns . . . started at cornerback in 24-3 win as defense allowed just 233 yards total offense . . . recorded career-best five tackles vs. Wyoming, including three solo stops . . . also had first career interception and 41 yard return and one pass break-up.

Josh Jackson Vs Ohio State: 

He moves backwards in his pedal better than any CB in this Draft. Just watch the great feet as he weaved in front of the WR, and destroyed the timing of the pass. The QB threw it anyway (:01). The other defender intercepted it, but that INT was caused by Jackson's feet in finesse press.  

He does a good job naturally protecting the sideline (:10). He bailed just before the snap. Watch the sidesaddle as he shuffled back with one eye on the QB (:22). Lined up in way Off. You can see his quick feet moving. Then he got in front of the RB (:27). He bailed before the snap, and took the inside WR (:33). The QB threw to the outside guy, and Jackson took him down quickly. 

Another great look at his elite feet in Press. Watch the great snap in his hips as the WR breaks inside (:44). He took on the TE, and didn't give up an inch protecting the sideline (1:00). He got a chuck in on the WR going upfield, and then broke outside and tackled the TE out of bounds (1:05). He doesn't give up an inch of space for the QB to throw into (1:28). Watch the great snap in his hips outside, and the jab with the inside hand. That is great press coverage.

It looked like he thought he had the outside WR in the Bunch. So he was late getting to #9, but the big guy dropped it. That was what is called "lucky" coverage (1:34;). Watch the footwork, hands, and eyes. He saw it all before him, and stopped and shed #9 as quick as pie (1:41). He got back quick with great feet, and turned outside with elite fluid hips (2:03). He turned and ran with the WR down the sideline with ease (2:08). Slipped the hips sideways like they were greased (2:15). And flowed effortlessly sideways down the sideline eyeing the QB. He is so good at keeping one eye on the QB, and one on the WR.

He turned and bailed with one eye on the QB. When the WR made his break back to the QB, he was so quick and explosive that he soared through the WR's back to break that pass up. He also got over his back and picked it off. That is elite coverage (2:21). He zoned it outside, and came up fast when he saw the RB catch the ball, and took him down fast (2:28). It's like he knows were the WR is going to make his breaks (2:35). And he just waits there and grabs him. 

Way off. Watch the elite COD and burst forward, as he saw the QB throw underneath (2:40). This is what he is so great at doing. His elite technique and movement skills allow him to see the QB and the receivers. Watch the quick burst out of his shuffle, which allowed him to step in front of the big Tight end, and leap up to intercept the ball (2:45). You can see on replay, how he read the play because he can look back and doesn't have to stare down his Man. He can turn and watch the QB, and in this case the TE crossing underneath him. He saw the QB throw, and went and snagged the ball like a WR. That is not just a great athletic INT, but also a great technique and intelligent interception. 

I absolutely love his feet and swivel hips in Press. There is a reason he had 8 INTs, and 18 PBUs (3:08). He read the play. Then angled back backwards, eyeing down the QB, to cutoff the third receiver angling to his sideline (3:14). Watch the two great jab steps as he reacted to the WR's two moves, and then the route is over (3:29). Way Off. He moved backwards in front of the outside WR effortlessly (3:35). Watch how quick he goes from pedal to bursting forward (3:44). He slammed the WR, but he didn't go down. However, he was going in the wrong direction and wasn't going anywhere.

He knew where the WR was making his break. Then watch the elite alertness as he saw the WR going deep and took off after him (3:51). See how he hopped back, and stayed deep in front of the WR, like he knew that the QB was going deep (4:07). Plays his position and zone outside perfectly. Just doing his job (4:21). He is so quick at angling outside with one eye on the QB (4:28). That was a great interception (4:40). He got himself in a little trouble letting the WR get past him, but it looked like he new the WR was coming back. Smartest CB in the Draft. 

He can play every kind of coverage (4:56). He switched nicely to the underneath WR (5:17). Great patience in coverage. He flowed naturally to where the QB would have to throw the ball on the Flag pattern (5:24). Watch the great physical press that takes the WR right out of his pattern (5:35). Then the elite one handed INT. That is as physically gifted an interception as I have ever seen (5:44). Not just the physicality at the LOS, but also the elite burst, quicks, hand, and ball skills to snag the INT. If that doesn't sell you that he is a 1st Round pick than there is nothing left to say. 

Josh Jackson Vs Ohio ST:

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ZyJVtak_jjY

Jackson's Official Bio:

Overview: Led nation with eight interceptions . . . eight interceptions ties school single-season record (Desmond King, 2015, Lou King, 1981, Nile Kinnick, 1939) . . . had two interception returns for touchdowns (43, 52) at Wisconsin . . . only player in conference history with two scoring returns in a Big Ten game . . . two returns tied school single-game and season records . . . tied single game school record with three pass interceptions vs. Ohio State . . . also led the nation in passes defended (26), ranked second in interception return yards (168), and tied for second in touchdowns (2) . . . tied for fourth nationally in pass break-ups (18) . . . six total turnovers in consecutive games vs. Ohio State and Wisconsin, including five interceptions and one forced fumble . . . moved from defensive back to wide receiver during 2015 spring practice, before returning to defense in the fall.

2017 Honors: Unanimous Consensus First Team All-America . . . first team All-America by AFCA, Associated Press, FWAA, Sporting News, Walter Camp, College Sports Madness, CollegeFootballNews.com, ESPN.com, SBNation.com, USA Today, and Phil Steele . . . Permanent Team Captain, defense . . . Hayden Fry Award, defense . . . named Big Ten Conference Tatum-Woodson Defensive Back of the Year . . . first team All-Big Ten by league coaches and media . . . recipient of 2017 Jack Tatum Award, presented by Touchdown Club of Columbus . . . one of three finalists for 2017 Jim Thorpe Award . . . named Big Ten Conference co-Defensive Player of the Week vs. Wisconsin and Ohio State . . . named National Defensive Player of the Week vs. Ohio State by the Walter Camp Football Foundation and Chuck Bednarik Award . . . semifinalist for the Chuck Bednarik Award . . . 

2017: Started at cornerback in all 13 games . . . recorded 48 tackles, including 34 solo stops and 14 assists . . . collected eight interceptions, 168 return yards, and two touchdowns . . . also had 18 pass break-ups, one forced fumble and one blocked field goal . . . averaged 7.2 yards on five punt returns . . . started at cornerback in 24-3 win as defense allowed just 233 yards total offense . . . recorded career-best five tackles vs. Wyoming, including three solo stops . . . also had first career interception and 41 yard return and one pass break-up . . . started at cornerback in 44-41 OT win at Iowa State . . . set career-high for second straight week at Iowa State with six tackles, including four solo stops and two assists, along with a shared tackle for loss and three pass break-ups . . . also added one punt return for four yards . . . started at cornerback in 31-14 win over North Texas . . . recorded three solo tackles vs. North Texas, along with one interception, two pass break-ups and a blocked field goal . . . also added one punt return for 17 yards . . . started at cornerback in 21-19 loss to #4 Penn State . . . five tackles vs. Penn State, including three solo stops and two assists, to go with one pass break-up . . . also had one punt return for four yards . . . started at cornerback in 17-10 loss at Michigan State, recording two solo tackles and one pass break-up . . . started at cornerback in 45-16 win over Illinois . . . recorded five tackles vs. Illinois, including three solo stops and two assists . . . also had two punt returns for 11 yards . . . started at defensive back in 17-10 OT loss at Northwestern . . . four solo tackles and three pass break-ups . . . started at defensive back in 17-10 win over Minnesota as defense allowed just 281 yards total offense . . . four pass break-ups and three tackles in win over Minnesota . . . started at cornerback in 55-24 win over #3 Ohio State . . . matched single game school record with three interceptions vs. Ohio State, with 22 return yards . . . also had three solo tackles . . . started at cornerback in 38-14 loss at #6 Wisconsin . . . two interception returns at Wisconsin, returning both for touchdowns (43 and 52 yards) . . . also had one forced fumble (recovered by Iowa), one pass break-up and three total tackles . . . started at cornerback in 24-15 loss to Purdue . . . four tackles vs. Purdue, including three solo stops and one assist, to go with one pass break-up . . . started at cornerback in 56-14 win at Nebraska as defense allowed 67 rushing yards and just 267 yards total offense . . . four tackles at Nebraska, including two solo stops and two assists, to go with one pass break-up . . . started at cornerback in 27-20 Pinstripe Bowl win over Boston College as defense allowed just 21 net rushing yards and 102 yards total offense in second half . . . one solo tackle vs. Boston College, along with interception in fourth quarter after Iowa had taken the lead to tie single-season record.

2016: Saw action in 12 games, with one start at cornerback . . . recorded 10 solo tackles, with one tackle for loss, along with four pass break-ups . . . saw action in 45-21 win over Miami, recording one solo tackle . . . saw action in 42-3 win over Iowa State, recording one solo tackle as defense allowed just 291 yards total offense . . . did not see action in 23-21 loss to North Dakota State . . . saw action in 14-7 win at Rutgers, but had no statistics as defense allowed just one touchdown . . . saw action in 38-31 loss to Northwestern, recording one pass break-up . . . saw action in 14-7 win at Minnesota, recording one solo tackle as defense allowed just 102 net rushing yards and 268 yards total offense . . . saw action in 49-35 win at Purdue, recording one solo tackle and one pass break-up as defense allowed just 47 net rushing yards . . . saw action in 17-9 loss to #10 Wisconsin, but had no statistics . . . saw action in 41-14 loss at #12 Penn State, recording one solo tackle . . . saw action in 14-13 win over #2 Michigan, but had no statistics as defense allowed just 201 yards total offense . . . saw action in 28-0 win at Illinois, but had no statistics as defense allowed just 61 net rushing yards and 198 yards total offense . . . saw action in 40-10 win over #15 Nebraska, as defense allowed just 90 net rushing yards and 217 yards total offense . . . forced into fulltime action vs. Nebraska due to injuries and responded by matching career-high with two solo tackles and a career-best two pass break-ups . . . started at cornerback in 30-3 Outback Bowl loss to #17 Florida . . . career-best three solo tackles vs. Florida, including one tackle for loss.

2015: Saw action in all 14 games, recording eight tackles and two pass break-ups . . . saw first action of career in 31-14 win over Illinois State, recording one solo tackle as defense allowed 35 net rushing yards and 231 yards total offense . . . saw action in 31-17 win at Iowa State, recording career-best two solo tackles as defense allowed no points and just 66 yards total offense in the second half . . . saw action in 27-24 win over Pitt, but had no statistics as defense allowed just 55 net rushing yards and 282 yards total offense . . . saw action in 62-16 win over North Texas, recording one solo tackle and one pass break-up . . . saw action in 10-6 win at Wisconsin, but had no statistics as defense allowed no touchdowns and just 320 yards total offense . . . saw action in 29-20 win over Illinois, recording one solo tackle as defense allowed just 46 net rushing yards . . . saw action in 40-10 win at Northwestern, recording one pass break-up as defense allowed just 51 net rushing yards and 198 yards total offense . . . saw action in 31-15 win over Maryland, recording one solo tackle . . . saw action in 35-27 win at Indiana, but had no statistics . . . saw action in 40-35 win over Minnesota, but had no statistics . . . saw action in 40-20 win over Purdue, recording one solo tackle . . . saw action in 28-20 win at Nebraska, but had no statistics . . . saw action in 16-13 loss to Michigan State, recording one solo tackle . . . saw action in 45-16 Rose Bowl loss to Stanford, but had no statistics.

2014: Redshirted.

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