Derrick Henry- RB Alabama

6-2 5/8, 247, (O) 4.54, (U) 4.52, 

10'10"! 37" Vert! 11.5 60-yard!

33" Arms, 22 Reps,

7.2 3-C, 4.38 SS, 

He Never Gets Caught From Behind.

By TOM

I don't care what anyone says Henry is lock to be a great RB in the NFL. He runs with an elite blend of speed, size, and power, like nothing he have seen since... Oh, I can't go there... Can I? No. Okay screw it, since the best RB I ever saw run in the NFL, Earl Campbell. Now he doesn't have Earl's elite lateral burst and inhuman change of direction, but he has that impossible blend of size and power. 

It really bugs the crap out of me people say he does have good speed. "I think when you look at Derrick Henry you have to get past the style points and style issue," Saban said. "He's a unique guy with a unique style. He's got great length. He's got a great stiff arm. He's really hard to tackle, and he's really-really fast. He can catch the ball. He's a really good receiver. And he can block." No one catches this guy from behind. Now, he doesn't always have a great initial burst once the QB sticks the ball in his gut, but he has great eyes and makes adjusts behind his blockers. When they turn into lanes, and he can turn on the speed he is gone. He has tops in weight for RBs at the Combine, and ran a top five number, 11.50, in the 60-yard Drill, which is a drill to measure long speed and conditioning.

Plus like Earl, when he hits defenses head on, he hurts them. "So if you don’t have this sort of pigeon-hole perception of what a running back needs to be," Saban said. "And you can get past all that and just look at the production. You’ll be wise in terms of how you look at Derrick Henry, and what his performance will be for you down the road." Then he takes off down a seam and is gone. 

Despite all the carries he had last year, he still doesn't have a lot of wear on his tires. He had 395 rushes from scrimmage last season, but only 208 carries combined over the previous two seasons. He split carries his first two years at Alabama, and was suppose to split carries this year as well. But Kenyan Drake got injured, and then he was just too good to stop giving the ball. His power into the the hole is amazing. His stats last year are too many to list completely:

JUNIOR (2015): In his first season as the team’s full-time starter at Alabama, Derrick Henry claimed the Crimson Tide’s second Heisman Trophy and led his team to the College Football Playoff National Championship ... he also won the Doak Walker and Maxwell Award and was selected as the Walter Camp Player of the Year ... a unanimous first team All-American ... first team All-SEC by the league’s coaches and the Associated Press ... selected as the SEC Offensive Player of the Year by both outlets ... rushed for a school- and Southeastern Conference record 2,219 yards, which led the nation and was the fifth most in a single season by an FBS player in college football history ... averaged 147.9 yards per game, which was second in the country ... his 28 rushing touchdowns were a national best and an SEC record, snapping Tim Tebow and Tre Mason’s old mark of 23 … led the SEC in rushing in conference games with a 179.2 yards per game average, including 13 touchdowns … averaged 166.0 yards per game against ranked teams (nine games) and 138.8 yards per game (20 TDs) against the 10 rushing defenses he has faced ranked in the top 50 nationally ... averaged 102.8 yards per game after contact, which represents 70 percent of his rushing yards ... had multiple rushing touchdowns in nine games this season … set the Alabama single-season record with 10 100-yard rushing games and four 200-yard games, which broke Bobby Humphrey’s school record (3) set in 1986 … only the third running back in SEC history (Herschel Walker and Bo Jackson) to have four 200-yard games in a single season ... netted at least 95 yards in 12 of his 15 games this season ... set the school record with 11 consecutive games with a rushing touchdown and finished his career 20 straight, which was the most in the SEC history ... caught 11 passes for 91 yards ... accounted for a team-high 109 first down rushes on a school-record 395 carries ... averaged 5.6 yards per carry ... had 45 explosive rushes of 12 yards or more and 17 carries of 25 yards or more ... his 2,219 yards rushing and 28 rushing touchdowns were single-season SEC and school records ... named MVP of the SEC Championship Game … garnered SEC Offensive Player of the Week honors against the Badgers as well as FWAA and Maxwell Award National Player of the Week accolades ... five-time SEC Offensive Player of the Week (Wisconsin, Georgia, Texas A&M, Mississippi State and Auburn) … named the Walter Camp National Player of the Week after the Auburn game … named one of the UA coaching staff’s offensive players of the week for his efforts against Wisconsin, Middle Tennessee, Ole Miss, Georgia, Texas A&M, LSU, Mississippi State, Auburn and Florida.

He made decision makers giddy at the Combine and his Proday. "[Henry] got some extra credit for stepping in as a receiver because the event didn't have enough wide receivers," Gil Brandt said about his Proday. "The scouts on hand were ecstatic over how well the 2015 Heisman Trophy winner caught the ball. Henry stepped in and showed that he has real good route-running ability, and that is just another skill that he possesses that people didn't realize that he was so good at. Henry really helped himself out at the pro day." He is also excellent in blitz pick up on passing down.

At Alabama's Proday, they didn't have enough WRs to throw to. So Henry volunteered to help out. "I got here and got to watch all my teammates out here compete," Henry said at his Proday. "All of us out here competing and putting on a show for the scouts and all the teams. I felt pretty good. I just wanted to come out here and catch balls. I was just doing what I've been doing and showing scouts that I can catch. So it was a good day." He is such a freak athlete. There has not been a power runner to come out like him in decades, who is also a great receiver.

He stepped outside and ran WR patterns like he had been playing outside at Alabama for three years. "I'm good with running anything to catch the ball," Henry said. "Anything to make myself more versatile, more useful, I'm all for it." Think of what he offers a spread team with those two skills. He can go step outside and run patterns from an Empty formation (like the Pats, ssshhhh). 

He could be the best power RB in the NFL on first down. Then can step outside as the X on the 2nd down as the Pats go Empty (ssshhhh). Then can line up in the shotgun next to his QB on 3rd down, and block for Brady in pass pro ssshhhh). Plus, he was on some punt coverage teams at Alabama (but obvious you don't want his guy wasting hits on special teams in the NFL, even the GOAT Jim Brown only had so many hits in his body). A defense cannot defend that wide a variation of formations, without subbing, when he is on the field with Gronk and Bennett (ssshhhh, you idiot shut up!). 

He is one of those guys who can do anything he wants on the field. He is so big that he does not get credit for his freakish athleticism. He reminds me of Jim Brown in that aspect. There has not been an athlete on the field with his size that also is so gifted athletically that he can do anything he wants on the field, as well as any other guy. Alabama needs WRs at their Proday, and he just goes out and runs patterns and catches the ball as well as any of the WRs. They need a blocker on punt returns, so he just steps out and covers punts. I don't think he gets the credit for that versatility that belies his size, and GMs and coaches saw and loved.

Henry is pure brute force on short yardage. He can lower his head and move the pile. he wins on 4th and 1, and had a 37-yard run on 4th an 1 this season. Then he just decides that he can step outside and play in the pass game like a WR. "I just wanted to catch the ball," Henry said about his Proday. "All these [RB] drills, we do them all the time. We did them at the combine. I just wanted to catch the ball and show them I could catch." He stepped outside at Alabama's Proday, which was something he never did, and was a top WR on the field.

He also reminds me of Jim Brown in another aspect. Now before you get your panties in a twist, it is a very specific way. He reminds me of Brown in the fact that teams and scouts don't know what to do with him. "I don't really know," BB's bubby Nick Saban said, "I think when you look at Derrick Henry you have to get past the style points and style issue. He's a unique guy with a unique style. He’s got great length. He's got a great stiff arm. He's really hard to tackle, and he's really-really fast." Even his own college coach isn't sure how to quantify him.

Now he is a little too high hipped and long legged, and I think that hurts him more in the NFL. But Mr. Brown was taller than any RB they had seen in his time, and he was a little long legged too. "In late November of that year," Tim Layden wrote, "Time magazine had featured 'Jimmy' Brown on its cover. The accompanying story was burdened by the awkward, race-tinged prose of the time, including the headline—'Pro Football: Look at Me, Man!'—and a description of Brown as '…. a fire-breathing, chocolate-colored monster...'" Now it wasn't just on the field that people didn't know what to do with him. There were always those wretched racial overtones of the "good ol' days" which really weren't so good for most non white males. But they didn't know what to do with Brown on the field either with his: fierce athleticism, size, speed, and crazy power.

Mr. Brown, the greatest RB of all time, was labeled as a FB when he first went to Cleveland. Paul Brown just wanted him to use his freakish size, strength and power as a FB to block and run inside. "But Paul refused to give me enough wide-running sweep plays," Mr. Brown said. "When we saw ourselves continually losing when we knew we could have won, it just took heart out of us. We lost that burning desire to win that a team has to have if it's going to win. How do you think we felt coming off a field beaten, and all of us there in the locker room knowing that the tremendous power we represented simply wasn't being used to its capacity? I don't like to knock the man, but truth is truth, that's all. If he had just been willing to compromise, to adjust only a little, he could have remained the top coach in pro ball. Anyway, some other players and I finally told Art Modell that unless the coaching methods changed, we'd either insist on being traded or quit. Well, any owner of a team is first and foremost a businessman. That next January—this was 1963—Art announced that Blanton Collier was replacing Paul Brown as head coach. We went into the new season a thinking, working team again. I had my best year and we took second place in the Eastern Conference. Then, in 1964, we won the league championship." They had just never seen a guy that big and tough, and that fast before. Even the guy who many think was the greatest football mind of his time, above Lombardi, had no idea what to do with him.

When the NFL Channel compared Henry to a player at the Combine, they compared him to Von Miller. A passrushing Defensive End? With all their files, backgrounds, and stats, they could not find a RB to compare him to. They had no clue what to do with Brown either when he came out. He was too big, too angry (which was a racial stereotype as well, that Mr. Brown actually cultivated to his advantage), and ran too upright. They wanted him to block. He was averaging 147 yards a game, and idiots complained because he refused to block like a FB, because he wasn't a FB. He had FB size and power, but he also had Gale Sayers speed. 

Then Paul Brown just started running him. It is the same with Henry. He's too big to be an RB. He's too built up to be a WR. But he could play either position. He is too high hipped. He gets too high in pass pro, and lets smaller guys get under him when he blocks. He is too long legged. He's too much of a long strider, who doesn't make the quick make you miss cuts of a 5-9 197-pound scatback. But his pundit always want to leave out the weight and power part of his game. I'm not sure, but I think there is exactly a 50-pound different between him and the scatback. He's to slow to be a speed back. But nobody, and I mean nobody catches him from behind. 

Oh yeah, and he stinks (ssshhhh). He is too slow to reach the LOS. When the play isn't blocked well, he gets hit behind the line of scrimmage too easily, because he doesn't stop and start well. I mean, he rarely gets tackle for a loss. You know, I've seen him hit by four guys in the backfield and still reach the LOS, like Earl (ssshhhh). He should clearly be a late 2nd, early 3rd Round pick. He is so long legged and high hipped that he can't stay and play low well enough for his power to translate to the NFL. No one, and I mean no one, should even think about Earl. I mean Mr. Brown... please. I mean, no one, and I mean no one, should even consider Henry until at least pick 60 (ssshhhh). 

He is not an I-formation only short yardage RB. He runs power out of the Shotgun all the time. Alabama runs a Pro Style offense, and often lines up in a two-TE Singleback like the Pats run. And last season he ran for over 2,000-yards, won the Heisman. Then led Alabama to the Championship against Clemson. What he did last season game in and game out has not been seen for decades:

Wisconsin: Rushed for a then-career-high 147 yards and three touchdowns on just 13 carries in the season opener ... his 11.3 yards per carry average was also a career high ... the scoring plays came on runs of 37, 56 and two yards ... also hauled in two catches for 12 yards to finish with 159 all-purpose yards ... teamed with Kenyan Drake to rush for a combined 224 yards and four touchdowns on the night. Middle Tennessee: Gained 96 yards on 18 carries in just over a half of action ... scored three rushing touchdowns for the second straight week and averaged 5.3 yards per carry. Ole Miss: Recorded his second 100-yard rushing game of the season with 127 yards on 23 carries and one touchdown ... caught five passes, a career high, for 51 yards, including two for first downs ... five of his rushes went for first downs. ULM: Rushed for 52 yards on 13 carries with one touchdown in limited action after missing several days of practice during the week due to illness ... gained three first downs. Georgia: Led the Crimson Tide rushing attack with a career-high 148 yards on a then-career-best 26 carries ... also broke off a 30-yard touchdown, his school-record tying 10th consecutive game with a rushing touchdown ... had four explosive rushes of 12 yards or more and four rushes that resulted in first downs. Arkansas: Rushed for 95 yards on a career-best 27 carries with one touchdown ... two rushes for 12 yards or more ... his touchdown set a new Alabama record for consecutive games with a rushing touchdown. Texas A&M: Had a new career high for rushing yards by the end of the first quarter on his way to 236 yards on 32 carries ... added two touchdowns and caught one pass for 18 yards ... had 10 first-down rushes and six explosive plays. Tennessee: Recorded his eighth game of at least 95 yards rushing and his fifth 100-yard effort with 143 yards on 28 carries and two touchdowns ... had 12 rushes that accounted for first downs and four rushes of 12 yards or more ... scored his 13th and 14th touchdowns of the season. LSU: Gashed the Tigers’ defense for 210 yards on the ground on a career-best 38 carries and three rushing touchdowns ... averaged 5.5 yards per carry against the nation’s No. 6 rushing defense entering the game ... carried 10 times (13-play drive) on the Tide’s final drive to run out the final 9:18 on the clock, accounting for 78 yards. Mississippi State: Cracked the 200-yard barrier for the second straight week and the third time this season with 204 yards on 22 carries and two touchdowns ... averaged 9.3 yards per carry and caught one pass … accounted for seven first downs rushing … had three explosive plays, including touchdown runs of 74 and 65 yards. Charleston Southern: Accounted for all 68 yards rushing on the Crimson Tide’s first two drives of the game … averaged 7.6 yards per carry on nine totes … also caught a screen pass for 28 yards and a first down … scored his 20th and 21st rushing touchdowns of the season with runs from 17 and two yards out … six of his nine carries went for first downs … had two runs of more than 12 yards. Auburn: Produced another Heisman-worthy performance as he put the Crimson Tide on his back and rushed his way past the Tigers on the Plains to the tune of 271 yards on the ground on a school-record 46 carries … his 271 rushing yards were 11 more yards than Auburn had in total offense (260) … scored a touchdown on his 46th and final carry on a 25-yard jaunt that capped 14 straight rushes to end the game … his 14 straight rushes is the second longest in school history (Sherman Williams had 15 straight at Arkansas in 1994) … earned Walter Camp National Player of the Week honors and SEC Player of the Week accolades … averaged an astonishing 5.9 yards per carry against the Tigers with 14 first-down rushes and six explosive plays of 12 yards or more. Florida: Earned MVP honors as the Crimson Tide won its 25th SEC Championship, rushing for 189 yards and one touchdown in a 29-15 win over the Gators … had 10 first down rushes and three explosive plays of 12 yards or more … marked his school-record ninth 100-yard rushing game of the season. Michigan State: Broke the SEC rushing touchdowns record with two scores to give him 25 on the season ... carried 20 times for 75 yards. Clemson: Rushed for 158 yards and three touchdowns as the Crimson Tide claimed a 45-40 victory to win the national championship ... carried 36 times, including a 50-yard touchdown scamper in the first quarter and then sealed the win with a one-yard plunge with 1:07 remaining in the game.

I know I might be using some hyperbole with the comparisons. Obvious he is not Mr. Brown or Earl in most comparative ways. But who do you compare him too? The only two modern guys who make sense are Stephon Jackson and Eddie George. Yet George couldn't come close to his speed on the second and third levels, and Jackson just didn't come close to his size and power. George had a lot of his power, but even he didn't come close to his size. He showed up at the Combine at 6-2.3, 254, and ran an incredible 4.54, and he never gets caught from behind. 

He has rare competitive speed for a man his size. The final thing that makes those hyperbolic comparisons valid is that he hurts defenders when he crashes into them like Earl and Mr. Brown. And no one catches those three guys from behind on the football field. It's that, like Jim Brown, we have never seen anything like him before. He has the size of D-ends, like Mr. Brown. And yet like Mr. Brown he runs like a WR out in the open field. I cannot wait to see him run in the NFL.

Public Service Announcement:

Okay I went a little crazy with the comparisons for Henry. So just calm down and read what I said. I'm not saying that Henry will be the greatest RB of all time. But I do compare him to the guys who were, and always will be the GOAT. That doesn't mean I think he will be able to challenge Mr. Brown for the GOAT title at RB, and average over 147 yards per game rushing, and lead his team to Champ games. Or Earl, who was the best I ever saw personally, for sad short period of time. It means that he shares some traits with Mr. Brown. Although, Henry ironically averaged 147.9-rushing yards per game last year, and won led his team to the FBS Championship (which I wasn't thinking about when I wrote this). He also average an impossible 197-yard rushing per game in his division last season, the SEC. How many NFL HCs would like to have a guy who could do that in their Division in the NFL? I can only thin of 32.

He also shares some traits with Earl. However, their running styles couldn't be any more different. Earl was the biggest and fastest RB in the NFL in his day, much like Henry will be, but he had amazing make you miss lateral explosion like no one I ever saw. Plus, he could switch styles and lower his head and attack defenders, and knock them backwards like he was Mr. Brown. But one trait Henry shares with Earl and Mr. Brown is that when he runs he doesn't just hurt defenders, he injuries them. He knocked Mackenzie Alexander out of the Championship game against Alabama. I say that they won that game because he did that. That game was so close at the end that it is hard to argue that Clemson doesn't win it if they had had one of their top three defenders and best DB on the field for the whole game. He can shut down a side, and would have made life a lot tougher for Coker if he was on the field.

It's like Brady. He is the GOAT, and no one in this Draft is going to overtake him. But some guys share some traits in this Draft. Like Wentz. Wentz shared some commonality with Brady in college. He wasn't even given a shot to play early in his career, because he had an older winning QB in front of him. He didn't start as many college football games as he should have do to circumstances beyond his control. But when he got on the field he showed that he was a fierce winner. 

The same can be said for Conner Cook. Cook was not always the best QB in the FBS. But in the big time games he was the best QB in the FBS. He won his first three Bowl games. He not only won them, but they were big time Bowl games against top comp. He was the best player on the field in those games. He had late 4th quarter TD drives that turned all those games into comeback wins, and won them all (until this year). Those are very Brady traits. But he is not going to be Brady in the NFL. He is not going to challenge for the GOAT title at QB. That is as clear as I can be.

Additional Notes:

Arkansas: He has a very underrated burst to the hole. He runs so well with his eyes up, and does a great job reading the hole before as receives the ball. He seems to almost always make a quick cuts, usually to the left, once the ball is in his gut. I like how he is reading his blockers before the balls is in his gut. He follows his eyes so well when he runs.

Auburn: He hits the line so fast. He has such a great nose for the endzone. It seems every time I look up he bursting through the line and hurting defenders. Very underrated quickness inside and in the holes. He can make guys miss in the hole with his quick feet. He had 16-carries for 102-yards in the first half of the Auburn game. TMIWTMIL (Which is a note I put in my game notes during the college season. That's "The more I watch him the more I like him", in case you were wondering where Daniel Jeremiah and Greg Cosell get that saying from. It's me. Your welcome Ross) You cannot just grab him and expect him to slow down. He is so strong with the ball in this hands.

Georgia: He has such nifty feet. Still runs a little high, but he holds onto the ball. He does a great job ducking his head when big guys come to hit him. When he hits the pile he keeps it moving backwards longer than most. Plays special teams and covers punts. When things are tough, he can just lower his head and give the D-line gut shot after gut shot. He can take a beating for a RB, and then suddenly break off along TD run, like he did against Georgia.

LSU: When this guy gets moving he is so big and strong that DBs just can't get him down. Such a great long strider in the open field. He can hand fight with a DB running down the sidelines for 20-yards. He makes DBs look small and weak. His straight arm to the helmet shudders DB's head. It is amazing how he dives forward and slides for another yard or two when he gets hit hard enough to go down. He doesn't just get a yard or two falling forward, he gets four or five extra yards when he falls forward though contact. When he can just run straight ahead he damages defenders in the hole. TMIWTMIL (when I get two of these in the same season, than I have to compare him to Mr. Brown, or some other GOAT).

Missippi ST: He has the speed to turn the corner. And when he can run full speed into the DBs, he hurts them. When Alabama has a lead in the 4th, he is so good at bringing them home. He finished out the game in the 4th against LSU and Miss ST. Defenders like to go low on him, and he runs over the lower leg tackles so well. He is so much more effective in the 4th quarter.

Ohio State 2014: He just keeps breaking tackles. He average 6.6 YPC (in 2014). Which was more than Yeldon, who went in the 2nd round. Word coming out of Alabama is that he is stronger, faster, and in better shape do to a rededicated work out program coming into 2015. Nice power heading into the line and always seems to get his body falling forward. Underrated speed. He is a 240 pound back who is shifty in traffic and has that speed you need on the second level, and is untouchable on the 3rd level. Great eyes at the LOS. He flies into the hole, and then redirects with a little skip, and is through the line faster than you think. He will hold onto the ball with both hands going through the line sometimes. Nice ball security. Nice hands on the Screen. He might be more effective on passing downs than he has shown. He does block on playing actions on passing downs.  

Previously Released: Henry's Proday: Henry is a true freak at RB. "You can’t be happier for a young man who has done so much for so long who worked real hard to reach his dreams," Saban said. "I don’t know how anyone could represent the university in a more first-class way." He garnered an incredible 70% of his rushing yards after contact.

He is so big and strong that his freakish athleticism is too often overlooked. "I think he’s a guy that is hard to compare to anyone because he’s so big and fast," his high school coach Bobby Ramsay said. "He needs to be in an offense that allows him to run downhill. He’s become a more patient runner and I think he’s got Pro Bowl ability; beyond that, like Hall of Fame or something like that depends on where he ends up and how healthy he remains. Either way, I certainly feel like he has what it takes to be one of the top backs in the NFL." He has Lacy's size, but it is all muscle. Plus, he is so much faster than Lacy that it is scary.

When you look at what he did in the Playoffs it is remarkable. "Not at all. Derrick definitely deserves it," Ramsay said when asked if he deserved all the accolades. "You look at what he’s meant to that team and the production he’s had against the top competition. You start talking about breaking Herschel Walker’s records and Bo Jackson’s records; these guys are true legends and he’s passing them. Look at what he did against Wisconsin, Georgia, LSU, Mississippi State. Then you carry your team in the SEC championship game. Nothing against those other two guys, they’re outstanding, but I think Derrick should win that." When you start talking about a guy who broke Hershel Walker and Bo Jackson's college records than no one can say he didn't deserve the Heisman. 

What will make him special in the NFL is that he is much faster than given credit. "He's fast," Saban said. "He's faster than people think. He's faster than he looks." He never gets caught from behind. I can't tell you how many times he busted through the line for long runs, and no one could catch him as he rumbled down field.

JUNIOR (2015): In his first season as the team’s full-time starter at Alabama, Derrick Henry claimed the Crimson Tide’s second Heisman Trophy ... named Doak Walker and Maxwell Award winner ... selected as the Walter Camp Player of the Year ... unanimous first team All-American ... first team All-SEC by the league’s coaches and the Associated Press ... selected as the SEC Offensive Player of the Year by both outlets as well ... rushed for a school- and Southeastern Conference record 2,061 yards to lead the nation and is averaging 147.2 yards per game, which is second in the country ... his 25 rushing touchdowns are also a nation’s best and a SEC record, snapping Tim Tebow and Tre Mason’s old mark of 23 … led the SEC in rushing in conference games with a 179.2 yards per game average, including 13 touchdowns … averaging 167.0 yards per game against ranked teams (eight games) and 136.7 yards per game (17 TDs) against the nine rushing defenses he has faced ranked in the top 50 nationally ... averaging 102.8 yards per game after contact, which represents 70 percent of his rushing yards.

Henry and Kelly Vs Wisconsin:

Henry runs up in an I-shotgun, and just runs a dive. Watch the subtle fake right and break left. Then he slashes behind Kelly. Here is a play that shows some of things we have never seen since Earl and Brown. He runs through the diving arm tackle of one ILB, and slams into the other ILB. As the first ILB spins in the air because he was foolish enough to try and grab his thigh, watch the second ILB bounce off his helmet, and stumble sideways to the ground. He hurts defenders when he runs (:01). Kelly #70 hikes the ball, and then gets his arms up quickly into the NT. He double teams the NT with the ORG, and watch Kelly punch the NT back and off balance as the ORG pushes him as well. He has some of the heaviest hands I have ever seen. But what makes him special, is what happens next. The ORG skips off and goes to the second level. Watch Kelly grab the NT, and twist and bend him awkwardly around until he trips over another teammate. I should stop this tape right here. It really doesn't get any better than this. 

Kelly gets low, digs low, and gets underneath the NT again. Watch the NT jolt backward, and then the ORG hits him and he gets jolted backwards again. Then he turns and punches the ILB up and back. They run a Draw to Henry. He doesn't always show great burst once the ball is in his gut, and gets hit at the LOS. But watch the power as he runs though D-end for five yards (:09). Here he is in a power Singleback on 3rd and 2, and everyone knows he is getting the ball. You can say what you want, but he gets the ball in his gut, reads the blocks, and cuts to the left with some excellent speed. Oh, and he falls forward for five again (:17). Watch Kelly grab the NT, but the NT gets leverage on him. Kelly lost the initial fight by getting too high. But watch the odd arm twist, like he is trying to elbow him. Then he twists him to the left with all upper body power. The ORG comes over to help, but Kelly is already twisting him out of the play. So the ORG turns through the hole in front of Henry. Damn I though this would be a wicked quick Tape. I'm still only 20-seconds into it, LOL. Oh well, at least the opening I wrote for this Tape turned into the hyperbolic intro for the whole Tape.

He gets the ball, and watch the great quick burst to the left. He saw the D-end breaking free inside, and didn't adjust for Howard's crack back block. That is a nice initial burst once the ball is in his gut. However, three defenders break free right in front of him and he gets hit at the line. But he is still able to spin forward for two yards (:22). Kelly tries to twist the NT out of the way again with his hands, but the NT fights back. So Kelly ends up twisting both to the ground. Even when his technique fails, his hands and power are strong enough to twist the NT to the ground.

Now, in order to play RB in the NFL you have to be able to block. Henry is the best 3rd down back in this Draft. He can catch the ball like a WR. But watch him block here. He gets the play action, and watch the D-end burst past the OLT. Henry slams him with his hands and knocks him two yards sideways. The D-end recovers so he punches him to the ground. I don't understand this play. Henry almost knocked him down with the first hit. Then knocked him down with the second hit, and he still sacked the QB (:29). Watch Kelly sink his knees. Grab the rushers shirt, and push him up as he stones him. You cannot have better technique pass blocking inside. That play should be watched by any kid who wants to play OC.

So you thought I was exaggerating how he can catch the ball like a WR. Watch him hop up, and reach up over his head and catch the ball as naturally as anyone in the Draft. Now he is out in space with the ball in his hands. Kelly gets in a little trouble on this play. The NT gets under him again, only this lime he extends his arms and bends him backwards. He has totally beat Kelly, but is still only able to bend him back less than three yards in pass pro (:35). Kelly is great on this play. Watch him blast off the snap and slam the NT back and sideways like a rag doll. Then he turns and hits the ILB, and takes him out as well (:46). I know Henry is slow, and doesn't have a great initial burst once the ball is in his gut, but watch him cut to the left. Then burst to the right. Then through the NT and with the slowest of speed, I have ever seen burst to the second level. He is being chased by a Safety. So you know some one as slow as him is going to be caught from behind. Oh yeah, Derrick Henry never gets caught from behind. "All I need is a line, and I'm good," Henry said.

He gets the ball heading to the left. He immediately gives a single shimmy and cuts to the left behind Howard. He finds a lane to the safety. You can see him at the LOS, already with his head up reading the block of Howard. Howard jams the safety with his inside shoulder. So Henry cuts to his outside shoulder, and gets tackled from the side. If Howard had hit the safety with his other shoulder, Henry could have gotten outside and would still be running (1:00). Kelly just does what he does. He powers into the NT, and gets him moving backwards. The ORG hits him sideways, and Kelly drags him out of the play.

Okay, here he is with four defenders in the backfield. He has no room and nowhere to go. Neither would any other RB in this Draft. But because of his size and power he is able to fall forward through three defenders to reach the LOS. That is a good run. I know it is impossible to believe, but even Jim Brown and Earl Campbell got tackled in the backfield upon occasion. That play was not a failure by Henry. It was a failure by his blockers (1:07). Kelly is about the only guy who makes a block on this play. He always does such a nice job getting his hands out and moving up into the NT off the snap. Then he uses his legs to power him back and too the side. That is a great power block.

When his blockers do their jobs, he is slashing through the LOS like an angry runaway train. Watch the quick stall, as he gives #71 time to reach the D-line past him, and then the great burst behind that block. Then he is tripped up at 20, and falls down on the 24 (1:12). Kelly is just so good moving forward. He is elite moving backwards in pass pro as well, but he is so much fun to watch bending, twisting, and powering defenders backwards. Watch him shove the DT sideways two yards, so he is on the wrong side of the ORG. Then he gets to the ILB on the second level and takes him out of the play as well. He is so good in the run game.

Watch the great burst through the line. It looked he was going to thunder for another long TD, but just gets tripped up at the end. That is great speed and burst through the hole. He flashes to the second level faster than any guy his size should be able to. He is so good at falling forward. It seems he falls forward for four or five yards every time instead of one or two. Here he is flying forward, as he falls forward for four extra yards again (1:18). Kelly does that chicken wing thing again. He pops into the NT and gets him moving to the right. Kelly grabs his shirt, and keeps him going sideways with his inside arm that looks like he is trying to elbow him. Notice how often Henry cuts behind Kelly's block. It seems like every run he he has his eyes up looking for #70.

Ironically, Kelly doesn't have a great block on this play. He gets his hand on the D-linemen, and the OLG destroys him. Kelly is left looking for someone to block (1:25). Henry makes one guy miss in the backfield, with his burst once the QB put the ball in his gut. Then he reads the blocks, and cuts back behind he block of Howard. Makes #6 and #19 miss on the second level with his impressive speed, and he is gone. And he never gets caught from behind by puny humans. Despite his obvious lack of speed.

Here is Henry in pass pro again. He spots the late blitzer late, and uses his hands and feet to violently shove him past the QB. If he didn't need to rest, he could be the best 3rd down back in the NFL (1:36). We have all seen how Kelly is the elite run blocking OC in this Draft. Just watching Henry look for him as he runs to the line, and cuts off his block 90% of the time is proof enough. But we have only seen two pass blocks on this Tape. While he was perfect in those blocks it was still a small sample size. Here he does another important thing in pass pro. No one rushes his lane, so he drops back looking to his left to make sure the ORG is okay. Then he see his OLG is in trouble. So he turns and stones the rusher his his hands, and stops him instantly. That is another example of elite pass pro by an OC. He is a 1st Round pick.

Henry runs up to the line with nothing and no hole. So he lowers his head to move the pile, and then bursts out the other side for a very impressive five yards. It is amazing how he falls forward for four of five yards every time. This play is really stuffed. But watch Kelly power into the NT, and keep fighting and twisting him backwards with amazing power and tenacity. I know the Pats currently have five Centers on their roster, but could we get him (1:41), please? Kelly burst into the NT, and they stalemate each other. Then the ORG slams over and knocks both of them down. I don't know who the ORG is, but I'm starting to like him too (1:48). Henry charges into the hole. You can see two Wisconsin linemen fill the hole. Watch the great lateral burst that makes one defender fall on his face, and other stagger aimlessly forward like he is drunk. Then with the great Jim Brown like speed through traffic, he almost runs right through five defenders for the TD. 

Is their anyone on this green Earth that doesn't know Henry isn't running the ball up the gut here? No! Two elite lateral bursts at the LOS. First the cut left behind the crack back block of the tight end. Then the cut up field with a stunning burst forward as he hops over some trash and is crashing into the Endzone like a run away train at the end of the line (1:54). And like it matters, but there is Kelly fighting between two defenders to help keep them off the line, and then getting to the second level to a third defender, as he pushes the ILB into the Endzone. If those two guys aren't lock 1st Round Picks, than my name is Earl Brown.

As NFL defenses get smaller and smaller to stop the wacky passing games, they also get faster and faster. When NFL teams run now a days, they are running more and more between the Tackles, because the outside speed of NFL defenses is so good. Derrick Henry has been the best runner between the tackles the past two year in the FBS. When teams run now a days, they run Dives and Smashes over 75% of the time. That's Henry's game. And when they aren't running Smashes and Dives 74% of the time or more (yes that was a typo but I though it was funny), they are running Zone blocking schemes and letting the RB cutback, 90% of the time between the Tackles on zone blocking schemed plays, like Alabama likes to do as well. He is like the Jolly Green Giant, when teams seem to be looking for Little Green Sprout (LOL, did they play a commercial before the commercial). But the way the NFL is forced to run inside now a days, because of all the speed on defense, is what Henry does best.

Henry and Kelly Vs Wiscosin:

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=H4OZ-cHmXVk

 

 

#

Henry's Official Bio:

JUNIOR (2015): In his first season as the team’s full-time starter at Alabama, Derrick Henry claimed the Crimson Tide’s second Heisman Trophy and led his team to the College Football Playoff National Championship ... he also won the Doak Walker and Maxwell Award and was selected as the Walter Camp Player of the Year ... a unanimous first team All-American ... first team All-SEC by the league’s coaches and the Associated Press ... selected as the SEC Offensive Player of the Year by both outlets ... rushed for a school- and Southeastern Conference record 2,219 yards, which led the nation and was the fifth most in a single season by an FBS player in college football history ... averaged 147.9 yards per game, which was second in the country ... his 28 rushing touchdowns were a national best and an SEC record, snapping Tim Tebow and Tre Mason’s old mark of 23 … led the SEC in rushing in conference games with a 179.2 yards per game average, including 13 touchdowns … averaged 166.0 yards per game against ranked teams (nine games) and 138.8 yards per game (20 TDs) against the 10 rushing defenses he has faced ranked in the top 50 nationally ... averaged 102.8 yards per game after contact, which represents 70 percent of his rushing yards ... had multiple rushing touchdowns in nine games this season … set the Alabama single-season record with 10 100-yard rushing games and four 200-yard games, which broke Bobby Humphrey’s school record (3) set in 1986 … only the third running back in SEC history (Herschel Walker and Bo Jackson) to have four 200-yard games in a single season ... netted at least 95 yards in 12 of his 15 games this season ... set the school record with 11 consecutive games with a rushing touchdown and finished his career 20 straight, which was the most in the SEC history ... caught 11 passes for 91 yards ... accounted for a team-high 109 first down rushes on a school-record 395 carries ... averaged 5.6 yards per carry ... had 45 explosive rushes of 12 yards or more and 17 carries of 25 yards or more ... his 2,219 yards rushing and 28 rushing touchdowns were single-season SEC and school records ... named MVP of the SEC Championship Game … garnered SEC Offensive Player of the Week honors against the Badgers as well as FWAA and Maxwell Award National Player of the Week accolades ... five-time SEC Offensive Player of the Week (Wisconsin, Georgia, Texas A&M, Mississippi State and Auburn) … named the Walter Camp National Player of the Week after the Auburn game … named one of the UA coaching staff’s offensive players of the week for his efforts against Wisconsin, Middle Tennessee, Ole Miss, Georgia, Texas A&M, LSU, Mississippi State, Auburn and Florida. Wisconsin: Rushed for a then-career-high 147 yards and three touchdowns on just 13 carries in the season opener ... his 11.3 yards per carry average was also a career high ... the scoring plays came on runs of 37, 56 and two yards ... also hauled in two catches for 12 yards to finish with 159 all-purpose yards ... teamed with Kenyan Drake to rush for a combined 224 yards and four touchdowns on the night. Middle Tennessee: Gained 96 yards on 18 carries in just over a half of action ... scored three rushing touchdowns for the second straight week and averaged 5.3 yards per carry. Ole Miss: Recorded his second 100-yard rushing game of the season with 127 yards on 23 carries and one touchdown ... caught five passes, a career high, for 51 yards, including two for first downs ... five of his rushes went for first downs. ULM: Rushed for 52 yards on 13 carries with one touchdown in limited action after missing several days of practice during the week due to illness ... gained three first downs. Georgia: Led the Crimson Tide rushing attack with a career-high 148 yards on a then-career-best 26 carries ... also broke off a 30-yard touchdown, his school-record tying 10th consecutive game with a rushing touchdown ... had four explosive rushes of 12 yards or more and four rushes that resulted in first downs. Arkansas: Rushed for 95 yards on a career-best 27 carries with one touchdown ... two rushes for 12 yards or more ... his touchdown set a new Alabama record for consecutive games with a rushing touchdown. Texas A&M: Had a new career high for rushing yards by the end of the first quarter on his way to 236 yards on 32 carries ... added two touchdowns and caught one pass for 18 yards ... had 10 first-down rushes and six explosive plays. Tennessee: Recorded his eighth game of at least 95 yards rushing and his fifth 100-yard effort with 143 yards on 28 carries and two touchdowns ... had 12 rushes that accounted for first downs and four rushes of 12 yards or more ... scored his 13th and 14th touchdowns of the season. LSU: Gashed the Tigers’ defense for 210 yards on the ground on a career-best 38 carries and three rushing touchdowns ... averaged 5.5 yards per carry against the nation’s No. 6 rushing defense entering the game ... carried 10 times (13-play drive) on the Tide’s final drive to run out the final 9:18 on the clock, accounting for 78 yards. Mississippi State: Cracked the 200-yard barrier for the second straight week and the third time this season with 204 yards on 22 carries and two touchdowns ... averaged 9.3 yards per carry and caught one pass … accounted for seven first downs rushing … had three explosive plays, including touchdown runs of 74 and 65 yards. Charleston Southern: Accounted for all 68 yards rushing on the Crimson Tide’s first two drives of the game … averaged 7.6 yards per carry on nine totes … also caught a screen pass for 28 yards and a first down … scored his 20th and 21st rushing touchdowns of the season with runs from 17 and two yards out … six of his nine carries went for first downs … had two runs of more than 12 yards. Auburn: Produced another Heisman-worthy performance as he put the Crimson Tide on his back and rushed his way past the Tigers on the Plains to the tune of 271 yards on the ground on a school-record 46 carries … his 271 rushing yards were 11 more yards than Auburn had in total offense (260) … scored a touchdown on his 46th and final carry on a 25-yard jaunt that capped 14 straight rushes to end the game … his 14 straight rushes is the second longest in school history (Sherman Williams had 15 straight at Arkansas in 1994) … earned Walter Camp National Player of the Week honors and SEC Player of the Week accolades … averaged an astonishing 5.9 yards per carry against the Tigers with 14 first-down rushes and six explosive plays of 12 yards or more. Florida: Earned MVP honors as the Crimson Tide won its 25th SEC Championship, rushing for 189 yards and one touchdown in a 29-15 win over the Gators … had 10 first down rushes and three explosive plays of 12 yards or more … marked his school-record ninth 100-yard rushing game of the season. Michigan State: Broke the SEC rushing touchdowns record with two scores to give him 25 on the season ... carried 20 times for 75 yards. Clemson: Rushed for 158 yards and three touchdowns as the Crimson Tide claimed a 45-40 victory to win the national championship ... carried 36 times, including a 50-yard touchdown scamper in the first quarter and then sealed the win with a one-yard plunge with 1:07 remaining in the game.

SOPHOMORE (2014): A dynamic running back with exceptional size and speed ... finished the year with 990 rushing yards on 172 carries ... averaged 5.8 yards per carry with 11 rushing touchdowns ... became the 54th player in school history to eclipse the 1,000-yard barrier with 1,372 career yards on 207 carries ... had five receptions for 133 yards and two receiving touchdowns ... played in all 14 games with two starts ... had 21 explosive rushes of 12 yards or more while converting 47 first downs, including four on third down ... three of his five receptions were explosive, taking screen passes 29, 41 and 52 yards, respectively ... Alabama Offensive Player of the Week after the Florida game. West Virginia: Recorded his second straight 100-yard rushing performance and third of his career with 113 yards on 17 carries against the Mountaineers ... averaged 6.6 yards per carry and scored one touchdown. FAU: Rushed five times for 23 yards against the Owls, helping Alabama total 190 yards on the ground. Southern Miss: Rushed 11 times for 73 yards ... had two rushes of 12 yards or more, including a long of 21 yards. Florida: Notched his second 100-yard rushing effort of the season going for 111 yards on 20 carries against the Gators ... converted three first downs and had two explosive plays ... long rush was 29 yards and added one rushing touchdown ... caught one screen pass and turned it into a 29-yard gain ... finished with 140 all-purpose yards. Ole Miss: Rushed 17 times for 37 yards ... converted two first downs. Arkansas: Carried the ball seven times for 25 yards with a long rush of eight yards ... converted one first down on the ground, coming on third down. Texas A&M: Rushed 10 times for 70 yards for a 7.0 yards per carry average ... long rush was 13 yards ... scored one touchdown on the ground and one in the air ... turned his only reception into a 43-yard touchdown ... finished with 111 all-purpose yards. Tennessee: Rushed 16 times for 70 yards and a touchdown ... had two explosive rushes with a long of 28 yards ... converted three first downs, including one on third down. LSU: Ran eight times for 24 yards ... carried twice for nine yards in overtime, including an eight-yard run on first down from the 15-yard line. Mississippi State: Ran for 36 yards on 11 carries with a long of nine yards ... scored his fifth rushing touchdown with a one-yard plunge in the second quarter. Western Carolina: Made his first career start and gained 92 yards rushing for a 7.7 yards per carry average ... scored three touchdowns with two rushing and one receiving on a nine-yard catch ... had three explosive rushes of 12 yards or more and six first-down rushes on 12 carries. Auburn: Only had five carries, but made the most of them with a 14.4 yards per carry average ... broke off a 49-yard run that set up a 25-yard touchdown run two plays later ... finished with 72 yards rushing. Missouri: Ran for a career-high 141 yards while matching his career-high with 20 carries, scoring twice ... broke free on three explosive runs of 12 yards or more, including a long of 45 yards where he was tackled at the one-yard line ... had seven first-down rushes. Ohio State: Rushed 13 times for 95 yards and one touchdown ... added two receptions for 54 yards, including a 52-yarder ... accounted for 149 all-purpose yards on 15 touches (9.9 yards per touch).

FRESHMAN (2013): A true freshman who saw action in 12 games ... totaled 382 rushing yards on 35 carries for a 10.9 yards per carry average ... rushed 10 times (28.6 percent) for 12 yards or more while converting 17 first downs ... took his one pass reception to the end zone for a 61-yard catch and run in the Sugar Bowl ... contributed three tackles on special teams ... registered two 100-yard game (111 vs. Arkansas and 100 vs. Oklahoma). Virginia Tech: Earned playing time in his first game at the Capstone ... carried the ball once. Colorado State: Gained four yards on one carry. Ole Miss: Broke loose for 18 yards on two carries, including a 12-yard run that moved the chains. Georgia State: Averaged 10.0 yards per carry for a season-best 50 yards ... had a long run of 17 yards. Kentucky: Gained 16 yards on three carries, with one 11-yard burst. Arkansas: Registered his first 100-yard rushing game, going for 111 yards on six carries against the Hogs ... broke loose for a season-long, 80-yard touchdown run ... converted two first downs and had two explosive plays (12-plus yards) ... also forced a fumble of the opening kickoff of the second half, as the Tide recovered and turned the possession into a touchdown. Tennessee: With the Tide backed inside the Volunteers' 5-yard line late in the game, he bounced a rush to the outside and gained 20 yards ... finished with 23 yards on three carries, while also playing on special teams. Chattanooga: Averaged 11 yards per carry, going for 66 yards on six totes ... scored one touchdown on a five-yard run in the second quarter ... long rush was 27 yards ... had two rushes of over 12 yards and converted three first downs. Auburn: Made one assisted tackle on special teams. Oklahoma: Served as the Crimson Tide's No. 2 running back in the game and rushed for a game-high 100 yards on eight carries ... rushed for one touchdown on a 43-yard burst and turned the first reception of his career into a 61-yard touchdown ... totaled 161 all-purpose yards against the Sooners and also made a tackle on special teams ... averaged 12.5 yard per rush and 17.9 yards per touch.

RECEIVING G REC YARDS YDS/REC LONG TD YDS/G
2013 12 1 61 61.0 61 1 5.1
2014 14 5 133 26.6 52 2 9.5
2015 15 11 91 8.3 28 0 6.1
TOTAL 41 17 285 16.8 61 3 7.0
RUSHING G ATT YARDS YDS/ATT LONG TD YDS/G
2013 12 35 382 10.9 80 3 31.8
2014 14 172 990 5.8 49 11 70.7
2015 15 395 2219 5.6 74 28 147.9
TOTAL 41 602 3591 6.0 80 42 87.6

 

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