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Pats Vs. Broncos 7-Things For Sunday.

 

Part I.

By TOM

Greetings Pats Fans,

First off I just want to thank all the fans of this site. I have been promoting my books for sale primarily on this site. As a result, I have sold almost 500 books in the past year. Thank you for your support and patronage, both are greatly appreciated. I cannot tell you how happy it made me when I read that report. So thank you Draft fans and Patriot fans alike, and mostly thank you to all the fans of my books and website worldwide.

As result of all your great support, the start of the Patriots season, and the release of my third book And One (or should I say second novella on kindle), I will be offering Manfred's Argument (my first novella) for free on Amazon.com from September 10th to September 14th.

To all my faithful followers. Thank You.

Sincerely,

TOM

1. Gronk V. Part I:- First off, we have to go back to Gronk. This mess has gotten to the point where it is in longer recognizable. It has turn into a conspiracy against the Patriots. Where the League is stepping in and telling the refs to officiate differently against Patriots players. It seems to be an all out assault on the integrity of the game by the League Offices, again. The problem is that when you poison that well, the refs, you kill the integrity of the game for everybody. The refs may stink, but they have to at least have the appearance of neutrality. That is something that appears to be tragically missing this season.

There is nothing more irritating than the portrayal of the DBs covering Gronk as passing pedestrians. The DBs are not grade school kids innocently eating cookies and milk as they wait for the school bus. They are purposely creating the contact. When a DB purposely initiates contact 10-yards downfield it is called "defensive" pass interference, except as mandated by the League against Gronk. They don't want to give Gronk, and thus all the other Patriots players, the same protection they give all the other players in the NFL.

The opposing teams study film as well you know. They see that Gronk runs to the marker on 3rd down, and then makes his break. That is where you hit him if you want to disrupt his pattern. They are not innocent victims. They are purposely placing themselves in the path of Gronk's pattern to disrupt it. And when they extend their arms first it is "defensive" pass interference. The DB on the Broncos clearly extended his arms into Gronk first, to illegally chuck him 10-yards down field. That is one definition of "defensive" pass interference. Gronk clearly didn't extend his arms, but raised up his hands and elbow to protect himself from the chuck, and was called for a foul. That is a clear message to every defender on the defense. That it is okay to hit Gronk illegally, and worse! They will penalize Gronk for trying to protect himself.

The second the DB raises his hands first? That is a chuck, or a jam, or whatever you want to call initiating the contact. Once the defender initiates the contact, the offense player has to be allowed to protect himself. Gronk did not initiate on the contact on any of these. I don't care if his arms were extended or not. Of course he was extending them earlier, he was using his hands to protect his body from an illegal chuck so he could run his pattern. The DBs initiated the contact on all those calls. Gronk protected his body.

The refs promptly told the DBs, and Gronk that he is not allowed to protect his body from an illegal hit by the DBs. "There is no question about that," the normally neutral Jeff Howe said. "There is not even a debate, especially after that fourth quarter OPI called on Sunday. That closed the book on that debate; they are going after Rob Gronkowski. He didn’t even initiate the contact and was penalized on that play. That was the worst penalty, up there with the Malcolm Butler PI [against the Giants]. Those are the two worst penalties I’ve seen called this season against the Patriots." The offensive player has to initiate the contact for it to be a penalty.

The problem is that the DBs keep initiating the contact, where they know Gronk is going to make his break to get open. It is not an accident. They are purposely hitting him where the film shows he consistently makes his break to get the 1st down. "Similar to the second-quarter play, Bruton makes contact with Gronkowski at the stem of the route, putting his left hand onto Gronkowski’s left shoulder pad," the almost nauseatingly neutral Mike Reiss wrote. "At the same time, Gronkowski keeps his left arm bent while absorbing contact before partially extending it as he breaks to the sideline to create separation." Although he was a little wrong. This is a non-call at best. If it is pass interference? It defensive pass interference, period. The DB initiated the contact, and Gronk raised his elbows to protect himself, period. Offensive players have to be allowed to protect themselves on the field.

The inherent dangers of the League's mandate is two-fold. One- it allows DBs to be emboldened to get more and more physical against the Patriots. "There is no question about that. There is not even a debate, especially after that fourth quarter OPI called on Sunday." Howe said. "That closed the book on that debate. They are going after Rob Gronkowski. He didn’t even initiate the contact and was penalized on that play. That was the worst penalty, up there with the Malcolm Butler PI. Those are the two worst penalties I’ve seen called  this season against the Patriots." And most importantly it also opens up dangers and injuries for Gronk. If the refs refuse to protect a player than he has to protect himself. If the refs keep penalizing a player for protecting his body than the only result can be injury.

The refs refusal to allow Gronk to defend himself may not be purposeful by the refs, but it is purposeful by the League Officials who grade the refs performance. When the DB chucks him ten yard down field, Gronk is not pushing off to get space so Brady can through him the ball, as much as he is defending himself on the field. He has to let the DB know that if he is going to hit him illegally there is a price to pay. The refs in a scheme to defraud the integrity of the game on the field by League Officials took away Gronk right to defend himself on the field. Which can only reach one conclusion: the injury to Gronk was inevitable. He wasn't just pushing off to get open. He was putting his hands up, because he knew, you knew, I knew, the refs knew, that he was about to get illegally hit by the DB. If the refs won't protect me? You damn well better be ready. because my elbows will be up loud and proud!

They protect the tight ends in patterns a lot less in the NFL than they do WRs. Because they are so big. They let the DBs get away with more, because the tight end are going to win those collision and get open. The DBs know this. The TEs knows this. Gronk knows this. And you know the refs damn well know this. So why are they consistently turning those illegal chucks on Gronk into offensive pass interface calls? The Denver DB clearly initiated contact with Gronk, and clearly fully extended his arms, while Gronk clearly did not extend his arms. Under any interpretation of the rule that is not offensive pass interference. Unless…

Remember, these attacks on Gronk are in patterns, and then calling it a foul on Gronk when he protects himself, and this has been going on for so long that the Pats had to reach out to the refs and ask what the heck Gronk could do to stop the calls. "Yeah, you're right about not being able to control the calls," the OC of the NEP said. "I mean, they are what they are, and we have to play within the rules. I think that the best thing we can do is try to coach Rob based on the way that we've been told we can play. Rob very rarely, if ever, extends his arms, and we try to make sure that we don't do that. And I think that we try to make sure that we're not the one that's pushing or shoving or shoving or trying to move the defender in any way that's illegal. So I think a lot of time, the contact is initiated, and the question is who's initiating it. And we're fortunate to have a guy who is a big athlete and is bigger than the guys who are covering him, and at times I think sometimes we feel like the contact is made and because the other guy takes the brunt of it, sometimes we end up getting called for it. But you know, I think Rob is trying to play within the rules 100 percent of the time. We're never trying to do something that would create penalties, and we certainly are going to try to do everything we can to eliminate those penalties going forward because they certainly come at big times in the game and they affected a couple of drives the other night. We'll do everything we can to try to clean that up and help Rob and anybody else for that matter because we've been called for a few other ones along the way, too, to try to avoid those things coming up again. Yeah, you're right about not being able to control the calls. I mean, they are what they are, and we have to play within the rules. I think that the best thing we can do is try to coach Rob based on the way that we've been told we can play. Rob very rarely, if ever, extends his arms, and we try to make sure that we don't do that. And I think that we try to make sure that we're not the one that's pushing or shoving or shoving or trying to move the defender in any way that's illegal. So I think a lot of time, the contact is initiated, and the question is who's initiating it. And we're fortunate to have a guy who is a big athlete and is bigger than the guys who are covering him, and at times I think sometimes we feel like the contact is made and because the other guy takes the brunt of it, sometimes we end up getting called for it. But you know, I think Rob is trying to play within the rules 100 percent of the time. We're never trying to do something that would create penalties, and we certainly are going to try to do everything we can to eliminate those penalties going forward because they certainly come at big times in the game and they affected a couple of drives the other night. We'll do everything we can to try to clean that up and help Rob and anybody else for that matter because we've been called for a few other ones along the way, too, to try to avoid those things coming up again." That Is Patriots speak for, "suck it refs!"

Not only did Josh coach him to not extend his arms, Gronk didn't. He took the coaching and adjusted TO THE WAY THE REFS TOLD HIM TO. They talked to the refs, and the refs told them that if he didn't extend his arms than they would not call a PI on him. He didn't. They did. Facts are facts. So they not only stopped calling defensive pass interference for Gronk, like when the linebacker grabbed and held him from behind 20-yard down field against the Broncos (which is called for every other player in the NFL), they called pass inferences on Gronk whenever it get ultra-physical, and the contact was created by the defender.

If I'm Gronk, and it can be proven that the League singled him out as separate from all the other offensive players in the league to not allow him to defend himself on the field than that is a law suit waiting to happen. The injury Gronk sustained, and I don't buy all this crap that it isn't that bad, is a direct result of him not being allowed to protect himself on the field. It is the inevitable conclusion when you tell defenders that a there is one player on offense who is not allowed to defend himself on the field.

You cannot tell defenders that not only will you not protect an offensive player, but if it gets too physical you will call the purposeful defensive pass interference on that defender. And lets be honest, the defenders are purposely hitting Gronk where they see him make break in his patterns, just like they hit every other tight end in every other game. Just like Chung is so good at doing to opposing TE. Personally I don't think it is pass interference either way. It is just how defense is played. But if there is an infraction it has to be called on the player who is purposely, schematically, and coached to initiate the contact. That is the defender. In this case the defender who creating the contact.

Defenders react to what the refs are calling every week. If you let them cross the line repeatedly they will keep pushing it. If you reward them for crossing the line, and you call the penalty on the offensive player, they will get that message loud and clear, and they will eventually injure that offensive player. Football is not a contact sport like Basketball.

Football is a collision sport. "Yeah, absolutely," Brady said. "You know when a defender is in certain positions where you can't throw your guy, I mean you never want to throw into a certain zone where a guy is just eyeing you and lining your receiver up and it's a big blowup. There are a lot of times it's out-breaking routes and there's a corner that's sitting outside, and they come from the outside in and hit your receiver. You never really want to do that. We talk about that all the time. I think it's obviously a contact sport. Guys are going to get hit. You hate to see one of your guys take hits, and I do think they should change some of those rules with those defenseless receivers. I don't think there's anything different than a chop block. I mean, everyone else has their legs protected in the NFL. Quarterbacks get their legs protected. Defensive linemen get their legs protected. Linebackers get their legs protected. I don't see why a defenseless receiver shouldn't get his legs protected as well, so maybe that's something they'll look at in the offseason." When the refs take away a player's right to protect himself than he must get injured.

Offensive players need to be protected from these collisions as best as you can. It is a very fine and thin line between what has to be allowed and what is safe. In fact, they cross the line all too often. But the League and the refs are there to try and legislate safety as much as they can. Which we know in the end it is not going to be safe enough. But, when you single out a player, and take away the already inadequate protection the refs can supply. It's like taking the seatbelt out of cars, wondering why people keep getting killed by smashing through the windshields again.

The second problem also becomes that the refs have been slowly and surely extending the prejudice to the entire team and not just Gronk. "Maybe there is something out there. How can you say those are unfair things to think after the way the NFL targeted this team?," Howe said. "The other side is the officiating has been such a horror show all season long, and you probably have every other team in the league who can point to certain instances and say the officials bagged the game for them. The conspiracy theory is a tough one to subscribe to, but I think it’s absolutely legitimate when you look at the way they’re targeting Gronk." I don't know how Brady walked off the field after the beatings he took the past two games. It is time for the refs to start protecting the Patriots players again.

Defenders get their cues from the refs, like in any sport. If they are calling it tight you have to back off a little. If they are allowing the more physical stuff than the scoring is going to go way down. When they refuse to call a foul for a player he is going to get hit, elbowed, scratched, scrapped, have his legs taken out, bloodied, until he is hurt too much to play. And that just in basketball! In football? God have mercy on his soul.

And I'm not saying it is even a conscious decision by the refs and defenders. I don't know much, but I do know that no ref got in trouble this season for making a bad call on the Patriots. And worse, we now know that refs have been punished by being moved to a Patriots game. Which is another message that refs are receiving from their superiors. So consciously or unconsciously the line shifts in their heads to ere on the side of the Patriots opponent, so they don't get in trouble. Then the League singles Gronk out on top of that. Whether it is purposeful of not is irrelevant. The refs subconsciously get the message. The defensive player subconscious get the message. And Gronk is carted off the field on a low hit by a DB who was rewarded earlier in the game for hitting Gronk with an illegal chuck.

2. Gronk V. NFL: Part II: Secondly, the League has set itself up in a conspiracy of incompetence to stick it to the Pats. If refs make bad calls against the Pats they are not sanctioned. Which is not only heard loud and clear, it also become subconsciously saved to file. And the past couple of weeks, consciously placed in their brains. Just like basketball players who feel what the refs are calling in a game and adjust how they play defense. So must the refs adjust how they call games, by how they are judged by their superiors. When you screw the Pats over with game-changing incompetent calls, and don't get in trouble for it, than every referee under the employment by the NFL: reads, feels, and compensates for that information. 

And for all non Pats fans, we are not complaining about one call, one game, or one conspiracy. We are talking about nearing the end of a year long witch hunt to burn the Patriots at the stake. And it is time to end it! After a season long series of cues to destroy the integrity of the game against the Pats, the League Offices sanctions a crew for such utter incompetence that they can't even count to three, and that crew is "demoted" to the Pats game? Well, you don't need a neon sign the size of Trump's ego flashing "SCREW THE PATS" to figure out that message.

The cues of incompetence have been flashing all season. The League's stepping in to stop protecting Gronk has lead directly to his injury. When you single out a player than you are singling out a team. The refs are not just on the field to enforce the rules and keep control of the game. They are also on the field to protect the players from each other, and themselves. That is what seems to be missing when the Pats play, more so than any other team. The refs clearly fixed the game against the Pats. That cannot be disputed. The only question is was it done on purpose, or are they really just that incompetence, like in the 49ers v Cardinals game? The problem is that it is both.

When the League singles out a team, and in particular a player, the refs will instinctively follow their cue. They must. It is who is judging, grading, and sanctioning them. And maybe not right away. But as the season wears on, just like basketball players who can be removed from the game because of fouls called on them, they will get the message. Maybe no one in the League out right told the refs they want the Patriots to lose, but I can guarantee you that no ref got in trouble for a bad game-changing call against the Pats, like the Whistle Blower. The crew that tried to give Buffalo the game in the second half, they didn't get demoted. But the crew that blew the game for the 49ers? They got demoted. And the League sends another clear and present message to the refs in their Organization. They purposely, and extremely loudly, demoted the refs that fixed the game for the Cards to the Patriots game.

On it's own it is innocent enough. But the decision to move the demoted crew "the Game Fixers" to New England was a clear message to all the refs in the NFL. Whistle Blower- "Acceptable". The Game Fixers- "banished to New England". They have slowly and surely been given that message all season. Moving the crew, that according to the coach that WON the last game they officiated, "couldn't count to three." When you are being insulted by the winning coach for your incompetence, that is incompetence taken to a whole new level. So when the crew that embarrassed the integrity of the game on the field, after the game where the refs proved that they are not allowed by the League to protect Gronk on the field, are then "demoted" to the Pats game? That was the shot heard loud and clear by every referee around the world. There is no way to mistake that clear and present message to every referee in the NFL, "if you have to make a game-changing and/or player injuring mistake, you must make it against the Pats or you will lose you jobs." As if calling offensive pass interference on Gronk over and over, because he is just trying to protect himself on the field, wasn't bad enough.

Now you can call me nuts, but why wasn't the Whistle Blower demoted? He blew a whistle in the middle of what could have been the biggest play of the game, because Sexy Rexy stepped in front of him. That whistle was game-fixing incompetence. That crew wasn't publicly sanctioned. The crew that fixed the game against the Pats in Denver and helped cause the Gronk injury weren't publicly sanctioned. After all the other messages the NFL has given to their referees, like singling out Gronk, which also singles out the Pats team as a whole, the messages from the past two weeks have been received loud and clear.

It you fix a game through incompetence you will be sanctioned. If you fix a game through incompetence against the Patriots you will not be sanctioned. That is the "integrity of the game" the League Offices are promoting. Referees can only have as much integrity as the their bosses. If they do not get in trouble for making game changing incompetent calls against the Patriot? Than they will adjust, and close calls will go more and more against the Pats. Than their jobs are safe. That message has been be received, "when in doubt call it against the Pats." Until it gets worse and worse until they are simply making up call after call against the Pats. Well, all's I can say it that the League can go SuckMyBallsGate again!

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PatsFanMock12@yahoo.com

The dogs on Main St howl Because they understand.

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